U.S. Domestic Policy

A Critical Juncture: Public Opinion in U.S.-Mexico Relations

Since the 1980s, the cooperation between the U.S. and Mexican governments has improved tremendously. However, despite the deepening governmental, economic, and societal ties that have occurred over the last two to three decades, the way in which the U.S. and Mexican publics view one another has experienced several ups and downs. Public opinion in the bilateral relationship has risen and fallen even as official relations between the United States and Mexico steadily improved.

The Risks of Ending NAFTA

The growing complexity of the NAFTA negotiations has led to a series of discussions and statements regarding the potential scenarios that a critical situation in the negotiations themselves, or in a unilateral decision by President Trump to abandon the treaty, could precipitate. The Mexican government has been constructing a narrative aimed at preventing a sudden collapse of confidence and expectations, involving in that process the main business leaders.

Infographic | U.S. Apprenticeships: Challenges

Infographic | Who are the DACA Recipients?

Infographic | What to Know about DACA

 

What to Do With Diversity in a Society

One very dark December morning in the early 1990s I found myself shuffling my boot-clad feet, trying to keep warm as I waited on an ice-covered rail platform 150-odd miles northeast of Moscow. As a Russian colleague and I began to conclude the train would never arrive, he quietly explained that we were standing atop hundreds of bodies. The prison trains leaving Moscow during the 1930s arrived in these very same switching yards and, as they were divided up to head to different labor camps, those who hadn’t survived were simply tossed into a pit by the tracks.

“Tackling North America’s Workforce Challenges”: Ambassador Earl Anthony Wayne’s presentation to NASCO and Dallas County Community College District – Workforce Forum on August 31, 2017 in Dallas, Texas

A key challenge for all three North American economies is the training and education of their workforces as jobs, industries and sectors evolve and transform. The need for workforce development will likely only increase as new technologies are deployed and as we move into the Fourth Industrial Revolution, with higher use of advance technology in manufacturing and throughout the economy.

Labor Rights Enforcement under the NAFTA Labor Clause: What Comes Next under a Potential Renegotiation?

In late March, a draft letter from the acting U.S. Trade Representative meant to notify Congress of the Administration’s intention to renegotiate NAFTA began to circulate. A brief outline of potential U.S. negotiating objectives for labor was included in the proposal. Generally speaking, the few items in the document seem to suggest bringing the NAFTA labor provisions into line with labor conditionality agreements that have been attached to U.S.

Final Report | Charting a New Course: Policy Options for the Next Stage in U.S.-Mexico Relations

The relationship between Mexico and the United States, although undoubtedly facing its most severe test in decades, remains strong. However, the challenge to the status quo of the relationship in early 2017 does highlight the need to think about this relationship in a radically different way. In addition to reaffirming the truths of economic interdependence and mutual security support, it is clear that the time has come to focus on new issues in the relationship, to adopt a new tone, and to propose a new course.

Bridging the Gaps in Cybersecurity Policy

 

Major questions impacting key cybersecurity policy decisions remain unanswered.  As a new Administration takes office, how should key stakeholders think about gaps like the capabilities of non-state actors to do harm in the digital space?  Will other nations follow Russia’s lead and steal and leak information against foes? Is the future of the public-private partnership – especially in protecting America’s critical infrastructure – a promising one?  And what’s the state of play in development of international norms?  Can the U.S. provide meaningful input?

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