U.S. Domestic Policy

Taking Stock: American Government in the Twentieth Century

What is American government like today? How has it changed—and how has it remaind the same—over the course of the century now coming to a close.

The American Planning Tradition: Culture and Policy

The past half-century’s radical transformation of American cities and regions has paradoxically stimulated our interest in older forms of cities and renewed our respect for the planning tradition that created them. Today, with everything urban and public perpetually in crisis, we turn attentively toward the figures who shaped our cities and left a magnificent legacy of public spaces, public transit, public parks, public libraries, public schools, public health, and public safety.

Dilemmas of Scale in America's Federal Democracy

In the classical political thought of the West, it was supposed that democracies must be small and direct. Democracy was a form in which all citizens must participate, thus it could exist only on a very circumscribed scale—that of the Greek city-state, in which, ideally, an assembly was limited to the range of the human voice. As modern nations arose, there arose as well the alternative conception that democracy could be representative. The people were assured of opportunities to render judgment on the officeholders’ conduct of office.

At the End of the American Century: America's Role in the Post-Cold War World

“It was one thing,” writes editor Robert L. Hutchings in the introduction to the present volume, “to lead an alliance of Western democracies in a grand struggle against Soviet communism; quite another for the accumulated obligations of the forty years of Cold War confrontation to ensnare us in a continued international role against no certain foe toward no certain ends.” In At the End of the American Century, Hutchings brings together a distinguished group of authorities to review essential questions of morality, interest, politics, and economics in U.S.

Beyond Gender: The New Politics of Work and Family

“A basic restructuring of our economy is needed now,” writes Betty Friedan in her latest book, Beyond Gender. “And this restructuring can’t be accomplished in terms of women versus men, black versus white, old versus young, conservative versus liberal. We need a new political movement in America that puts the lives and interests of people first.

Funding the Modern American State, 1941-1995: The Rise and Fall of the Era of Easy Finance

The current fiscal crisis faced by the American federal government represents the end of a fiscal regime that began with the financing of World War II. In this volume, an interdisciplinary group of scholars explores the history of American taxation and public finance since 1941 in an attempt to understand the political, social and economic forces that have shaped the current regime.

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