U.S. Domestic Policy

Infographic: A History of Immigration Policy and Migration Flows

 

U.S. Supreme Court Rules on Upholding Housing Discrimination Law

History and Context

The Fair Housing Act, part of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, prohibits discrimination based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status and disability in the sale, rental and financing of housing-related transactions. Intentional discrimination resulting in disparate treatment is forbidden.

El Chapo Escapes: Major Setback for Mexico’s War on Organized Crime

The drug lord known as “El Chapo” has escaped from a maximum security prison for a second time. What are the implications for Mexico’s war on organized crime? Mexico Institute Director Duncan Wood provides an overview.

Sexual Scandal: Law and Justice in Russia

The news that the former U.S. schoolteacher Jennifer Fichter was sentenced to 22 years in prison for multiple counts of sex with minors caused an uproar on Russian social media. The story was covered by major national news portals, attracting thousands of mainly indignant comments.

5 Reasons America Should Fear the Global Middle Class

In his last State of the Union address, President Obama made a pitch for “middle class economics” to help America’s beleaguered middle class, which continues to face stagnant wages, job displacement and soaring college costs and debt. His stated goal was to provide Americans with the requisite tools to get ahead in a fast-paced, constantly changing global economy. Of course, the United States middle class is not alone. Those in other advanced industrial countries are suffering similar or worse fates.

Immigration: Transforming America

In the final installment of our recap of the Wilson Center May 2015 Alumni Conference, an expert panel explores the ongoing ways that immigration is transforming America.  That’s the focus of this edition of REWIND.

Part 1, a REWIND recap of a conversation between Madeleine Albright and Jane Harman, can be found here:  

Hold the Obituary: Is the U.S. Really in Decline?

In the second installment of our recap of the Wilson Center May 2015 Alumni Conference, we hear from an a-list panel of analysts addressing the question, “Is the U.S. in decline?” From the China challenge to the “rise of the rest,” America’s place in the world is being questioned from within and without. Is the American Century truly over and are its best days in history’s rear view mirror? That’s the focus of this edition of REWIND.

Is the U.S. Still the “Indispensable Nation?”: A Conversation With Madeleine Albright

Madeleine Albright served as U.S. Secretary of State (1997-2001) and also was a Wilson Center Scholar in 1981-82.

Law Day 2015: What Makes Magna Carta Mythic?

The 800th Anniversary of Magna Carta will be celebrated this June. The “Great Charter” provided the theme for the Law Day 2015 edition of the Leon Jaworski Public Program series, an event produced by the American Bar Association in cooperation with the Wilson Center. Panelists, with the help of Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, explored the question, “What makes Magna Carta mythic?” Their thoughts provide insight into an eight-century long legal-political tradition, its endurance, and continuing significance for the twenty-first century. That’s the focus of this edition of REWIND.

Is the United States at a Crossroads? Domestic and Global Dimensions

In this half-day conference, former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and leading experts from journalism and academia discussed the role of the United States in the world today and the future of U.S. immigration policy. These public events are part of a Wilson Center Alumni Reunion gathering.

9:00 - 9:45am: Conversation--Is the United States Still the "Indispensable Nation"?

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