U.S. Foreign Policy | Wilson Center

U.S. Foreign Policy

Engage Or Retreat? American Views On U.S. Foreign Policy

Washington is torn between two futures for US foreign policy: one of engagement and intervention, another of retrenchment and retreat. The 2020 presidential election will provide an opportunity for the American public to critically assess the Trump administration’s America First foreign policy.

Chilling U.S.-China Economic Relations: Options for Taiwan

The Trump administration’s trade policy has led to a seismic shift in U.S. economic relations with China. The imposition of tariff barriers in the name of national security in particular have strengthened Washington’s export control regime.

More Than Neighbors: U.S.-Mexico Trade

 

 

AfPak File: Assessing Imran Khan’s Visit To America

Earlier this week, Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan made his first visit to Washington since he became prime minister. He met with President Trump at the White House and held a series of other high-level meetings with U.S. officials and corporate leaders, among other activities.

The latest edition of The AfPak File reviews and assesses Khan’s visit. What are the main takeaways? Did Washington and Islamabad get what they wanted? And what’s next for the U.S.-Pakistan relationship?

Behind Asia’s Other Trade War

While the trade war between Washington and Beijing has garnered significant attention, another trade war between two of the world’s largest and most advanced economies is heating up. Japan and South Korea are the world’s third- and twelfth-largest economies, respectively, representing an annual GDP of greater than $6.5 trillion. Yet trade friction between Tokyo and Seoul has intensified as a political standoff, rooted in history and inflamed by domestic politics on both sides, has begun to impact the economies of two critical American allies and global supply chains.

The Aftermath of a Lackluster G20

Risks to global growth still loom large, not least as trade tensions between China and the United States remain unresolved after the latest G20 summit. Yet the biggest takeaway from the Osaka meeting is that the real, long-term threat to global stability is not friction over tariffs and trade imbalances. Rather, the biggest source of instability is the growing divide between the world’s two largest economic and political powers, and the rest of the world.

New Podcast: Need to Know

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Need to Know is a foreign policy news podcast produced by the Office of Congressional Relations at the Wilson Center. Bringing you the best non-partisan policy through conversations with our scholars.

Pages