U.S. Foreign Policy | Wilson Center

U.S. Foreign Policy

Wilson Center Establishes China Fellowship

 PRESS RELEASE
Contact: Ryan McKenna
Phone: (202) 691-4217
ryan.mckenna@wilsoncenter.org
 

Washington, DCThe Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars is pleased to announce the establishment of the Wilson China Fellowship, an initiative designed to build bridges between academia and policy while supporting a new generation of American scholarship on China.

Elections, Peace Talks, and U.S. Policy: What’s Next for Afghanistan?

Eighteen years after U.S. forces entered Afghanistan, the country is not only still at war—it is also in a state of flux. Its political future is uncertain, with the final results of a September 28 presidential election not expected until November. The fate of a fledgling peace and reconciliation process has been unclear since U.S. President Donald Trump called off talks with the Taliban. The direction of U.S. policy, and particularly the future American military presence, is also a major question.

Book Launch | Nuclear Crises with North Korea and Iran: From Transformational to Transactional Diplomacy

The ongoing nuclear impasses with both North Korea and Iran reflect a persisting tension in U.S. policy: Should diplomacy be transactional, focused narrowly on the discrete nuclear challenge, or transformational, comprehensively addressing these regimes’ objectionable behavior? Rhetorically, with both North Korea and Iran, the Trump administration aspires for the transformational. Breaking the impasses requires a pivot from a transformational strategy to the transactional.

Nuclear Crises with North Korea and Iran: From Transformational to Transactional Diplomacy

The ongoing nuclear impasses with both North Korea and Iran reflect a persisting tension in U.S. policy—whether the objective toward “rogue” states should be to change their regimes’ behavior or to change the regimes themselves. Should nuclear diplomacy be transactional, focused narrowly on the discrete nuclear challenge, or transformational, comprehensively addressing these regimes’ objectionable behavior? Rhetorically, with both North Korea and Iran, the Trump administration aspires for the transformational.

In Asia, Don’t Count the American People Out

Since the election of Donald Trump as President, foreign and American observers alike have sought to understand if his presidency would represent a new era of American disengagement and isolationism.

The Wilson China Fellowship

Understanding China’s Impact on Asia and the U.S.

The Fellowship

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