U.S. Foreign Policy

Neoconservatives in U.S. Foreign Policy under Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush: Voices behind the Throne

Jesús Velasco examines the origins and history of the neoconservative political movement so closely identified with the George W. Bush administration’s policies of regime change and democratization. Analyzing the movement’s intellectual background, institutions, financial supporters, publications, and points of influence, Velasco distinguishes the first generation of neoconservatives, which emerged in the late 1970s, from the generation that rose to power in the 2000s.

International Conference: The Euromissiles Crisis and the End of the Cold War, 1977-1987

CWIHP is pleased to announce the international conference The Euromissiles Crisis and the End of the Cold War, 1977-1987, organized by the Machiavelli Center for Cold War Studies (CIMA), the Craxi Foundation, CWIHP, the George Washington University's National Security Archive, and the Universities of Paris I (Pantheon Sorbonne) and Paris III (Sorbonne Nouvelle), in cooperation with Bundeskanzler Willy Brandt Stiftung.

Challenges From Pakistan

Pakistan has become the supreme challenge for U.S. foreign policy.

The world's sixth-most populous nation with 170 million people, Pakistan seemingly faces crises on all fronts. It shares borders with China, Iran, an unstable Afghanistan and India, its historic rival. This spring, it required a $7.6 billion loan from the International Monetary Fund to stave off bankruptcy.

Managing U.S.-China Relations

Originally published in the April 2009 issue of Centerpoint.

Undeclared War and the Future of U.S. Foreign Policy

Undeclared wars have a history in the United States almost as old as the country itself and bear an importance that has grown along with the nation’s power, international status, and technological proficiency. Kenneth B. Moss’s highly original argument in Undeclared War and the Future of U.S.

Soft Power and Its Perils: U.S. Cultural Policy in Early Postwar Japan and Permanent Dependency

This book examines the cultural aspects of U.S.-Japan relations during the postwar Occupation and the early years of the Cold War and analyzes their effect on the adoption of democratic values by the Japanese. Takeshi Matsuda finds that the results were mixed: Japan is an electoral democracy but intellectually remains elitist and submissive—in part because of U.S. efforts to reinforce the domestic importance of intellectual elites. The author is especially concerned with the development of American Studies in Japan, and U.S. efforts to foster it.

Behind the Bamboo Curtain: China, Vietnam, and the World beyond Asia

Based on new archival research in many countries, this volume broadens the context of the U.S. intervention in Vietnam. Its primary focus is on relations between China and Vietnam in the mid-twentieth century; but the book also deals with China’s relations with Cambodia, U.S. dealings with both China and Vietnam, French attitudes toward Vietnam and China, and Soviet views of Vietnam and China. Contributors from seven countries range from senior scholars and officials with decades of experience to young academics just finishing their dissertations.

Strategies of Dominance: The Misdirection of U.S. Foreign Policy

In a critical overview of U.S. foreign policy since the end of the Cold War, P. Edward Haley draws surprising connections between key elements of George W. Bush’s foreign policy and those of his predecessor, Bill Clinton. Haley further shows how these elements in both cases produced disastrous results, and he proposes an alternative that is constructive and tolerant but not amorally “realistic.”

Building the Next American Century: The Past and Future of Economic Competitiveness

Collaboration between the public and private sectors helped the U.S. economy recover from its last period of economic malaise, and similar collaboration is needed today, according to a key participant in the 1980s–1990s competitiveness movement.

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