U.S. Foreign Policy

Pakistan Selects a New Leader

In this edition of Wilson Center NOW we discuss Pakistan’s recent election with Michael Kugelman, Deputy Director of the Wilson Center’s Asia Program. He provides analysis on how the country’s next prime minister, Imran Khan, could shape relations with the United States and India.

Guest

Optics, Then Disappointment: Trump Can’t Deliver Much to Putin

The chummy joint news conference of Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump in Helsinki seemed to suggest that the Russian president had scored a major victory over his U.S. counterpart in their one-on-one meeting on July 17. Indeed, the optics could go a long way toward fulfilling Putin’s purposes: he badly wants the Kremlin to be seen as the White House’s equal on the world stage.

Assessing the Helsinki Summit

William Pomeranz, Deputy Director of the Wilson Center’s Kennan Institute, explains the core issues that could be addressed through improved US-Russia relations. He also identifies key takeaways from the Trump-Putin Helsinki summit in this edition of Wilson Center NOW

Guest

Aspen Security Forum: Southern Discomfort

Thanks to the autocratic Maduro regime, Venezuela is in political and economic free fall, with thousands of its citizens fleeing to other countries in the region and threatening to destabilize them. Autocracy is ascendant in Honduras as well. The once regional powerhouse, Brazil, has been consumed by a crippling corruption crisis for years. And, Mexico continues to be plagued by political and economic corruption and drug-fueled violence. Meanwhile, U.S. immigration policies are alienating our long-time friends and partners, and China is making inroads where we have long dominated.

Aspen Security Forum: America First

From pulling out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership and the Paris climate accord, to questioning the value of NATO and imposing tariffs on European allies, to renegotiating NAFTA, to tearing up the Iranian nuclear agreement, to promising to pull troops out of Afghanistan and Syria in the not too distant future, President Trump is upending 70 years of foreign policy orthodoxy in pursuit of his “America First” agenda. Meanwhile, a rising China and a revanchist Russia are working feverishly to fill the void.

U.S., Russia Can Look North to the Arctic to Find Common Ground

When Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin met face-to-face on Monday, Russia’s election interference, its annexation of Crimea and the implications of Cold War-style espionage in the United Kingdom provided most of the backdrop.

It’s likely that few, if any, of either president’s advisors, let alone commentators, are looking to the Arctic — yes, the Arctic — as a starting point for common ground and improving relations going forward. 

Next Steps with Pyongyang

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s latest trip to Pyongyang was a collision between the exaggerated claims made by President Trump following his summit meeting in Singapore with Kim Jong-un and the realities of diplomacy with North Korea.

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