U.S. History

Stalin’s Decision for War in Korea

At the end of the 1940s, when the Soviet Union was devoting its energies to reconstruction after the devastation of World War II and establishing control over new client states in Eastern Europe, Joseph Stalin was forced to negotiate a new treaty of alliance with the victorious Chinese Communists. Mao Zedong won significant concessions from Stalin. The Soviet dictator was compelled to alter completely his policy for Korea. Sam Wells will discuss this neglected aspect of the Cold War era.

Celebrating the Legacy of Daniel Patrick Moynihan: The Launch of "Moynihan's Moment," a New Book by Gil Troy

On November 10, 1975, the General Assembly of United Nations passed Resolution 3379, which declared Zionism a form of racism. Afterward, a tall man with long, graying hair, horned-rim glasses, and a bowtie stood to speak. He pronounced his words with the rounded tones of a Harvard academic, but his voice shook with outrage: "The United States rises to declare, before the General Assembly of the United Nations, and before the world, that it does not acknowledge, it will not abide by, it will never acquiesce in this infamous act."

North Korea and the American Radical Left

In NKIDP e-Dossier no. 14, "'Our Common Struggle against Our Common Enemy':  North Korea and the American Radical Left," Benjamin R. Young introduces ten recently obtained documents from the personal papers of Eldridge Cleaver, a former Black Panther Party leader, which describe Cleaver's fascination with and travels to the DPRK during the "long 1960s." 

Roundtable Discussion on the Future of U.S. Global Media

In any given week, from North Korea to Iran and across the Middle East, from China to Afghanistan, Pakistan and Myanmar, through Africa and India to Russia, Belarus, Central Asia and Cuba, 165 million people—equivalent to more than half the U.S. population—tune into the radio and television programs of U.S. International Broadcasting (USIB) by satellite, Internet and in some cases cooperating local radio stations. After more than half a century, Congressionally- funded U.S.

The Significance of Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation for America

What were Lincoln’s motives in deciding for general emancipation? The emancipation itself changed the nature of the war. It reflected a fundamental change in Lincoln’s own thinking about the relationship of slavery to the war as well as the future place of blacks in American life. The point is not that Lincoln freed four million slaves with a stroke of the pen, but that the Proclamation was a key moment in the complex and prolonged historical process that led to the end of slavery in the United States, with consequences to the present. 

Call for Papers: Selling America in an Age of Uncertainty: U.S. Public Diplomacy in the New International Order, 1965-1980

It is becoming increasingly apparent that the 1970s constituted a profound era of transition in international affairs. The American defeat in Vietnam, the breakdown of the Bretton Woods exchange system, and a string of setbacks including Watergate, Three-Mile Island, and reversals during the Carter years all contributed to a grand reappraisal of the place of the United States within the international order.

International Conference: The Historical Dimensions of South Africa's Nuclear Weapons Program

NPIHP is pleased to announce the international conference The Historical Dimensions of South Africa's Nuclear Weapons Program, organized and hosted by Monash South Africa, in collaboration with the Institute for Security Studies, (ISS Africa) and NPIHP.

Held in Pretoria, South Africa, from 9-11 December 2012, this landmark conference explored nearly every aspect of South Africa's nuclear development from the post-war era to the recent past.

Summer Institute on the International History of Nuclear Weapons

The 2013 SHAFR Summer Institute

14-19 June 2013

Women, Ecumenism, and Interracial Organizing

“Women, Ecumenism, and Interracial Organizing” is derived from the research Bettye Collier-Thomas conducted for Jesus, Jobs, and Justice: African American Women and Religion (2010). It explores the ways in which black and white ecumenical Protestant women grappled with issues of race and ethnicity in the early twentieth century and how in doing so they contributed to laying the groundwork for the modern civil rights movement.

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