National Security

The U.S. Can’t Get Rid of North Korea’s Nukes Without Paying a Catastrophic Price

Kim Jong Un is on a roll. After firing a second missile over Japan, successfully testing an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), and successfully detonating a larger-yield nuclear weapon, the North Korean threat has grown significantly more dire in just a few weeks. General John Hyten, who commands U.S.

Water, Security and U.S. Foreign Policy (Book Launch)

Capable of upending rural livelihoods, compromising institutions of governance, and inducing new patterns of migration and crime, global water stress has emerged as one of the principal threats to U.S. national security, said David Reed, senior policy advisor at the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and editor of WWF’s new book, Water, Security and U.S. Foreign Policy, on June 27 at the Wilson Center.

Fourth Annual "Building a Competitive U.S.-Mexico Border" Conference

The Wilson Center's Mexico Institute and the Border Trade Alliance were pleased to host our fourth annual high-level "Building a Competitive U.S.-Mexico Border" conference, which focused on improving border management in order to strengthen the competitiveness of both the United States and Mexico. Specific emphasis was put on a cooperative bilateral framework, border and transportation infrastructure, binational economic development, and the need for efforts that simultaneously support security and efficiency in border management.

Ready or Not: A Strategy for an Effective U.S. Military

The United States Military: Thoughts From Sen. John Cornyn on a Strategy for the 21st Century 

Immigration and Border Security in the Age of Trump

Wall or no wall, Mexico, the United States, and Central America face a migration crisis that will only continue to worsen. Tens of thousands of people—in particular from Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala—are being pushed out of their countries and towards the United States by a toxic combination of extreme violence, poverty, and lack of economic opportunities.

Assessing Tensions on the Korean Peninsula

For his first trip as Secretary of Defense, James Mattis traveled to South Korea to assert the U.S. commitment to that nation and to send a warning to its northern neighbor. This follows on the heels of North Korea’s claims that it is close to perfecting ICBM technology that would enable it to strike the continental United States. We asked the Wilson Center’s James Person to assess the current level of tension on the Korean Peninsula in the wake of Secretary Mattis’ visit.  That’s the focus of this edition of Wilson Center NOW

Guest

The Cybersecurity Dilemma: Hacking, Trust and Fear Between Nations

Why do nations break into one another's most important computer networks? There is an obvious answer: to steal valuable information or to attack. But this isn't the full story. This book draws on often-overlooked documents leaked by Edward Snowden, real-world case studies of cyber operations, and policymaker perspectives to show that intruding into other countries' networks has enormous defensive value as well. Two nations, neither of which seeks to harm the other but neither of which trusts the other, will often find it prudent to launch intrusions.

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