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National Security

Defense Priorities: Today and Tomorrow with Secretary Leon Panetta

About Leon Panetta Leon Edward Panetta was sworn in as the 23rd secretary of defense on July 1, 2011.

Before joining the Department of Defense, Mr. Panetta served as the director of the Central Intelligence Agency from February 2009 to June 2011. Mr. Panetta led the agency and managed human intelligence and open source collection programs on behalf of the intelligence community. 

21st Century Pathways to a Skilled Technology Workforce

As technology mandates a reevaluation of the preparation of our current workforce, improving students’ creative and computational skills are the key to unlocking the future success of America. Together with the National Center for Women and Information Technology (NCWIT), the Program for America and the Global Economy (PAGE) of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars hosted a series of panels on “21st Century Pathways to a Skilled Technology Workforce”.

Escalating Violence in Afghanistan

The recent attacks on the U.S. Embassy in Afghanistan and the assassination of former President Rabbani are desperate moves by the Taliban and similar organizations like the Haqqani network, says Jane Harman on Fox News Happening Now.

“Rogue States” and the United States: An Historical Perspective

The term “rogue states” entered the U.S. foreign policy lexicon after the Cold War to designate regimes that employed terrorism as an instrument of state policy and attempted to acquire weapons of mass destruction in pursuit of policy goals. Named to the core group were Iraq, Libya, Iran, and North Korea. Iraq and Libya have since experienced U.S.-directed or U.S.-assisted regime change. What are the implications for the ongoing challenges to international order and American security posed by Iran and North Korea?

"Rogue States" and the United States: A Historical Perspective

The term “rogue states” entered the U.S. foreign policy lexicon after the Cold War to designate regimes that employed terrorism as an instrument of state policy and attempted to acquire weapons of mass destruction in pursuit of policy goals. Named to the core group were Iraq, Libya, Iran, and North Korea. Iraq and Libya have since experienced U.S.-directed or U.S.-assisted regime change. What are the implications for the ongoing challenges to international order and American security posed by Iran and North Korea?

Confused Superpower

Click here to read former Australian Scholar Brendon O'Conner's article "Confused Superpower" in the Australian.

Who's Winning the War of Ideas in the Post-9/11 World?

Who's winning the war of ideas in the post-9/11 world? Asia Program Director Robert Hathaway answers this question and others as we observe the 10th anniversary of the attack on America.

In Uncertain Times: American Foreign Policy after the Berlin Wall and 9/11

Melvyn P. Leffler, former Wilson Center public policy scholar and Edward R.

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