National Security

Taliban Leader Mullah Omar’s Death Confirmed

Asia Program Senior Associate, Michael Kugelman speaks about the significance of the confirmed death of Taliban Supreme Leader Mullah Omar.

Turkey's New Role in the Fight Against ISIS: Game Changer?

Turkey has finally acceded to America’s request that it open up its southern airbases to U.S. aircraft combatting the Islamic State. The decision has been seen as a major breakthrough in the fight against ISIS and has been accompanied by a Turkish announcement that it too would actively join the anti-ISIS coalition. However, the situation has been complicated by Turkey’s simultaneous decision to also attack the Turkish-Kurdish insurgent group, the PKK, with which it had been engaged in peace talks.

The Other Nuclear Deal

The political class in Washington is consumed at the moment with parsing each clause in last week’s nuclear agreement with Iran for secret meanings, hidden loopholes and possible portents. That America would come to terms on a topic of such political and strategic sensitivity with a state long viewed with suspicion, if not outright antagonism, alarms some and angers others. Questions of who snookered whom abound. Sound familiar?

Five Things to Watch for in the Wake of Iran Nuclear Deal

Whether you’re about to break open the champagne or don sack cloth over the U.S.-Iran nuclear deal, you may have questions about the agreement. Here are five things to look out for in the coming days, as we all assess the text of the agreement and reactions to it:

A New Vision for US Foreign Policy

In an era of new and emerging global threats, Senator Chris Murphy believes there is an urgent need for a new vision for US foreign policy. During a recent Wilson Center address, he outlined eight principles for a vision that seeks to maintain U.S. global leadership while looking beyond our traditional military toolkit for engaging the world. He discussed the ideas with the Wilson Center's Aaron David Miller and attendees of the event. That’s the focus of this edition of REWIND.

Is No Nuclear Deal With Iran a Better Outcome for Obama?

I still think the odds favor a deal, soon, on the Iran nuclear issue. But as negotiations have continued, and in light of Iranian demands to eliminate the U.N. arms embargo, including restrictions on its ballistic missile technology, there are reasons that Barack Obama might now feel that no deal would better serve his interests. Consider the advantages if the president were to view time as an ally, not an adversary:

CANCELLED: The Iran Negotiations: Is this Really the End Game?

Iran and six major powers will keep negotiating past Tuesday's deadline for a long-term nuclear agreement. We will postpone this event on Wednesday, July 8 until a deal is announced.

Despite the uncertainties, the United States and Iran seem to be in the final stages of what promises to be a comprehensive accord on the nuclear issue. 

What If No Agreement Is Reached on Iran’s Nuclear Program?

President Barack Obama threatened Tuesday to walk away from nuclear negotiations if Iran doesn’t adhere to the principles it agreed to in April. Negotiators have formally extended talks to July 7 to give themselves additional time to conclude an agreement. I’m still betting on a deal in July. But what if there is no deal?

Let’s step back from the politics and the talking points.

The Hillary Doctrine: Sex & American Foreign Policy (Book Launch)

When Valerie Hudson evaluates the strength of a nation, whether food security, wealth, peacefulness, or quality of governance, she finds one important thread that underlies it all. “One of the most important factors in the determination of these things is in fact the situation, and security, and status of women,” said Hudson at the Wilson Center on June 24.

No, the Iran Nuclear Deal Will Not Be Good for the U.S.

Iran will get too much.

Once Iran learned how to make a nuke, there wasn’t much chance for a really good and reassuring deal on the nuclear issue. The agreement being negotiated now may well be the least bad of the terrible options available to slow Iran’s nuclear program. But we should be clear-eyed about what else we may be getting from this deal: a richer and stronger Iran, one pushing for a Middle East more hostile to the U.S.–and one that will still retain the capacity to build nuclear weapons.

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