U.S. Politics | Wilson Center

U.S. Politics

Eyeing the EU’s Overtures to China

Washington’s winters may or may not be harsher in recent years as a result of climate change. But in spite of all the concerns about weather pattern changes impacting nature, the city’s cherry blossoms have proven resilient to the volatility, this year being no exception. With the blossoms come another enduring fixture of springtime in Washington: the spring meetings of the IMF and the World Bank. Like the flowers, the message from the meetings too has been quite predictable.

Trump Threatens to Put Tariffs on Cars Coming from Mexico

"Imposing tariffs on cars for this reason would be a huge violation of existing trade rules. What’s more it would be immensely costly for US auto producers and consumers. It’s difficult to see this as a credible threat. The Mexican government will surely view this threat with some skepticism as well as frustration after making significant concessions to Trump on migration last week."

- Duncan Wood 

 

Immigrants, Evangelicals, and Politics in an Era of Demographic Change

As immigration from Asia and Latin America reshapes the demographic composition of the U.S., some analysts have anticipated the decline of conservative white evangelicals’ influence in politics. Yet, Donald Trump captured a larger share of the white evangelical vote in the 2016 election than any candidate in the previous four presidential elections. Why has the political clout of white evangelicals persisted at a time of increased racial and ethnic diversity?

The Responsibilities of Congress in Maintaining the Rule of Law

The Wilson Center is partnering with the International Bar Association to present the fourth program of "Preserving a Free Society," a six-part series of bipartisan discussions on the rule of law that feature current and former senior government officials and other distinguished guests.

Implementing the U.S. Global Water Strategy: A First-Year Review

In November 2017, the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Agency for International Development released the first U.S. Global Water Strategy. With contributions from more than 17 U.S. government agencies and departments, the Global Water Strategy lays out four interrelated objectives to support a more water secure world: increase access to sustainable safe drinking water and sanitation services, and promote hygiene; protect freshwater resources; promote cooperation on shared waters; and strengthen water governance and financing.

Event Recap: On the Brink: Trump, Kim, and the Threat of Nuclear War

More than six decades have passed since the signing of the Korean War Armistice Agreement halted the bloodshed on the Korean Peninsula. Although war between the two Koreas was put on pause, the promise of peace remains elusive to this day. Painfully aware of its vulnerability to its southern neighbor and the U.S. forces stationed there, North Korea began its nuclear program in the 1950s. Despite years of nuclear negotiations between the United States, North Korea, and other concerned parties, North Korea has persisted in its quest to obtain a reliable nuclear deterrent.

Remembering John Dingell and His 'Last Words for America'

Like many Americans, I was deeply moved by the final op-ed from John Dingell (John Dingell: My last words for America) that appeared in The Washington Post the day after we lost Congress’s longest-serving member. The Post reports that he “dictated these reflections to his wife, Rep. Debbie Dingell (D-Mich.), at their home in Dearborn, on Feb.

Bankers, Bailouts, and the Struggle to Tame Wall Street

In her book Broken Bargain, author Kathleen Day examines the history of financial regulation and of government oversight of corporations—which goes back to the founding fathers.

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