U.S. Politics | Wilson Center

U.S. Politics

Strategies of Dominance: The Misdirection of U.S. Foreign Policy

In a critical overview of U.S. foreign policy since the end of the Cold War, P. Edward Haley draws surprising connections between key elements of George W. Bush’s foreign policy and those of his predecessor, Bill Clinton. Haley further shows how these elements in both cases produced disastrous results, and he proposes an alternative that is constructive and tolerant but not amorally “realistic.”

Building the Next American Century: The Past and Future of Economic Competitiveness

Collaboration between the public and private sectors helped the U.S. economy recover from its last period of economic malaise, and similar collaboration is needed today, according to a key participant in the 1980s–1990s competitiveness movement.

Daniel Patrick Moynihan: The Intellectual in Public Life

One of the most distinguished figures in twentieth-century American politics, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, was at the center of virtually every major political issue of his day, offering a distinct voice unique in its prescience, scholarliness, and statesmanlike manner.

Federal Taxation in America: A Short History, 2nd edition

Extending from the ratification of the Constitution to the present day, W. Elliot Brownlee describes the five principal stages of federal taxation in relation to the crises that led to their adoption—the formation of the republic, the Civil War, World War I, the Great Depression, and World War II. Now in a new edition, Brownlee expands his coverage to the present, with a new chapter focusing on the tax policies of the current Bush administration. This discussion is set within a larger analysis of contemporary tax and fiscal issues, including war finance, Social Security, and Medicare.

Religion Returns to the Public Square: Faith and Policy in America

Despite talk of a “naked public square,&rdquot; religion has never really lost its place in American public life. As the twenty-first century opened, it was re-emerging in unexpected and paradoxical ways. Religious institutions were considered for expanded roles in welfare and education, at the same time that the limits of religious pluralism—as, for example, in the relation of Islam to American values—became a question of urgent public concern.

A Creative Tension: The Foreign Policy Roles of the President and the Congress

A Creative Tension is a unique look at the foreign policy roles of Congress and the president by one of the most astute congressional practitioners of foreign policy of recent decades, former U.S. representative and chairman of the House International Relations Committee Lee H. Hamilton. With an insider’s perspective based on thirty-four years in Congress, Hamilton elucidates current domestic and international pressures influencing U.S. foreign policy, strengths and weaknesses in the foreign policy process, and ways to improve the performance of the president and Congress.

Congress and the People: Deliberative Democracy on Trial

Will some form of direct democracy supplant representative, deliberative government in the twenty-first century United States? That question is at the heart of Donald R. Wolfensberger’s history of Congress and congressional reform, which runs back to the Constitution’s creation of a popularly elected House of Representatives and forward to the surreal ending of the 105th Congress, featuring barrels of pork, resignation of the speaker, and impeachment of the president.

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