Water | Wilson Center

Water

Thirsty Planet: How Water Can be a Source of Conflict or Cooperation

In this edition of Wilson Center NOW we speak with Gidon Bromberg about the water crisis in the Middle East which has been exacerbated by climate change.  Bromberg also discusses how his organization EcoPeace Middle East brings together Israeli, Jordanian, and Palestinian environmentalists to promote cooperative efforts to protect the region’s shared environmental heritage and advance sustainable regional development.

Guest

Citizen Science and Data Integration for Understanding Marine Litter

This article was presented at the Data for Good Exchange [D4GX] 2019 on September 15, 2019 at Bloomberg headquarters in New York City. The theme for this D4GX was "Data Science for SDGs," or how data science can progress forward the United Nation's Sustainable Development Goals by 2030. It is posted here with permission from Bloomberg. 

Authors: Jillian Campbell[1], Anne Bowser[2], Dilek Fraisl[3][4], Metis Meloche[2]

Hidden Forces: The Role of Water in Economic Prosperity

“If you woke up one morning and found the taps in your house were dry, the first thing many of us here would do is pick up our phone and call the utility,” said Gordon Mumbo, Team Leader for Sustainable Water for the Mara River Basin, Winrock International. But for people living in the Mara River Basin, if their taps run dry, there is no utility to call, said Mumbo.

USAID and the Private Sector: Blended Finance Partnership to Combat Ocean Plastic Pollution (Launch Event)

The amount of plastic pollution flowing into the ocean is increasing at an alarming rate, creating an urgent challenge for the world’s environment and economy. On our current trajectory, by 2050 — pound for pound — there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish. Most ocean plastic pollution emanates from developing countries — and, more specifically, from rapidly urbanizing coastal cities in the developing world — where waste management systems are struggling to keep pace with growing populations and increasing amounts of trash.

Water as a Tool for Resilience in Times of Crisis

Water serves as a tool for resilience only when access to it is consistent and the system for making it consistent is in place, said David De Armey, Director of International Partnerships for Water for Good, an international NGO. He spoke at a recent Wilson Center event, “Water as a Tool for Resilience in Times of Crisis,” the second event in a three-part series, Water Security for a Resilient World, sponsored by the Wilson Center, Winrock International, the Sustainable Water Partnership, and USAID.

Water, Conflict, and Peacebuilding: A New Animated Short from the Wilson Center and USAID

Water brings us together. It is essential to the health of individuals, the vitality of communities, and the stability of nations. A new animated short from the Wilson Center and USAID’s Office of Conflict Management and Mitigation celebrates how working together to ensure safe and sufficient water supplies not only increases the resilience of communities, but also helps build peace in war-torn nations.

Feeding a Thirsty World: Harnessing the Connections Between Food and Water Security

“Food production is the largest consumer of water and also represents the largest unknown factor of future water use as the world’s population continues to balloon, and we face increasing weather-related shocks and stresses,” said Laura Schulz, Acting Deputy Assistant Administrator in USAID’s Bureau for Economic Growth, Education and Environment.

Pages