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Global Trends, Local Stories: New Films on India and Ethiopia

On March 24, the DC Environmental Film Festival comes to the Wilson Center for the Washington, DC, premieres of two new short documentaries from ECSP, “Broken Landscape” and “Paving the Way.” Filmmaker and ECSP Multimedia Producer Sean Peoples will describe his journey from the eroded gullies of Ethiopia to the rat-hole mines of northeastern India during a panel discussion led by the Wilson Center’s Roger-Mark De Souza, with observations from Sierra Club's Kim Lovell and World Resources Institute's Ferzina Banaji.
 
About the films:

Environmental Review in Canada and the United States

On March 18, the Wilson Center's Canada Institute hosted Helen Cutts, the vice-president for policy development for the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency, for a round table discussion on the environmental review process in Canada and the United States. Our expert panel gave views from both in and outside government on contrasting procedures, the role sub-federal governments play in the process, how both systems incorporate the needs of native groups into their decision making, and what role concerns about climate change should play in approving or rejecting a project.

Resilience for Peace: A New Agenda

As “resilience” builds as a theme for the development community, a few key concepts are rising to the top of the conversation.

CEF Associate, Susan Chan Shifflett, Interviewed by the Guardian on China’s Food Security and Safety

For the past three decades an onslaught of urban development, desertification, and pollution has been eating away at China’s once-endless sprawl of tiny farms. China is facing radical challenge to feed its large population. “You have urbanization — people travel abroad,” says Susan Chan Shifflett, China Environment Forum’s associate. “They go to France, they see cheese, and they think, ‘why can’t I have brie in China?’ They’re changing their diets — meat consumption has quadrupled over the past 30 years.”

The Precarious State of Our Oceans

Humanity has had an unequivocal impact on the world’s oceans and our continued growth in population has seen a declining rate in fish populations and the growth of hypoxic zones devoid of animal life. A recent study by the University of California Santa Barbara points to the role of human activity in degrading marine fauna.

On February 25, a panel of experts will discuss how the oceans are reacting to the growing threat from humans and what can be done from a biological and security standpoint.

A Global Choke Point Report: China's Water-Energy-Food Roadmap

The water-energy-food nexus is creating a complicated challenge for China and the world. Energy development requires water. Moving and cleaning water requires energy. Food production at all stages—from irrigation to distribution—requires water and energy. As the most populous country and the world’s manufacturing hub, China demands all three resources in ever increasing amounts, leading to shortages that are creating serious choke points to the country’s development. Pressure on water is at the heart of these resource constraints facing China. 

North America's Fossil Fuel Boom: More Risk for Water?

A remarkable and unexpected surge in North America's production of oil and natural gas is reshaping domestic and global energy markets, dropping prices for gasoline, raising employment in the energy and manufacturing sectors, and prompting civic concerns about the risks to water, land, and communities.The continental fossil fuel boom also is directing more attention than ever before to the management, safety, and disruptive changes in the pipeline and rail transport systems that ship oil and gas to market.

Canadian Hydropower Could Lower U.S. Carbon Emissions

Canada generates a majority of its electricity from hydropower and is a global leader in hydroelectricity production. As a result, and in response to increasing domestic demand for clean energy in the United States, Canada is positioned to provide a secure and renewable source of electricity.

The Ripple Effect of Dams and Water Transfer Projects in China

In China no infrastructure project is too big. China has been accelerating dam construction to meet the country’s electricity hunger and calls for low-carbon power. The South-North Water Transfer project’s second canal came online this month shifting water to China’s parched north. At this meeting, Scott Moore (Harvard University/Council on Foreign Relations) will dive into the environmental and development challenges that this  water transfer project is facing.

Could a U.S.-India Climate Deal Be Next?

When news broke that the U.S. had signed a far-reaching climate deal with China, I wondered: Could the U.S. and India reach a similar deal?

While in India this month, I was struck by the poor air quality. Walking around New Delhi sometimes felt like being in a smoky house. The air seemed much worse than what I remembered experiencing in China last year.

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