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Water

Choke Point: India -- A Wilson Center-Circle of Blue Joint Initiative

On April 2, Circle of Blue and the Wilson Center present the findings of their Choke Point: India initiative, an exploration into the water-energy-food confrontations in the world’s second most populous country.

China's Water Problem

Jennifer Turner appeared on BBC World News' "Impact" to discuss the implications of drought in China. 

"If China really can become more aggressive in actually enforcing their water pollution control laws, it would open up a lot of clean water for the people," Turner said. 

Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Programs as a Strategy to Advance Maternal Health

Of all the Millennium Development Goals, the maternal health and sanitation targets are among the farthest off track, said Rebecca Fishman, operations and special projects director of WASH Advocates.

CEF Director Jennifer Turner talked about the missions of the China Environment Forum in the interview with International Innovation Journal

In the latest issue of International Innovation, a journal providing insight and analysis on current scientific research trends, Jennifer Turner was interviewed on the role of the China Environment Forum (CEF) in promoting international cooperation and dialogues on Chinese environmental issues. In the article, Turner underscores CEF’s efforts on water-energy issues as well as food safety in China. She introduces three main initiatives that CEF is continuously working on— Choke Point, Cooperative Competitors and Complex Connections.

Water, Conflict, and Peacebuilding in Development: Lessons for Practitioners (Toolkit Launch)

With almost 800 million people currently lacking access to clean water and two-thirds of the world’s population projected to face conditions of severe water stress by 2025, disputes over water are a growing global concern.

From Victoria to Chilwa: Integrated Development in Two African Lake Basins

In Lake Victoria and Lake Chilwa basins, interconnected development challenges defy sectoral boundaries, said experts at the Wilson Center on February 10.

Can China Solve Its Water-Energy Choke Point? Wilson Center Launches ‘China Environment Series 12’

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The Push and Pull for Hydropower in Vietnam and Cambodia

On September 7 2012, the largest of the eight dams on the Chinese side of the Upper Mekong (Lancang) River came online in Pu’er, Yunnan Province. The Nuozhadu hydroelectric station, Asia’s tallest dam, turned on the first of its nine generating units that hopes to supply 23.9 billion kilowatts of energy by 2014.1 Two months later, Laos announced that it was going ahead with the construction of the Xayaburi Dam and broke ground shortly thereafter, despite continued opposition from Cambodia and Vietnam. Indeed, like falling dominos, dams are cascading down the Mekong River.

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