Water

The Mosul Dam: Turning a Potential Disaster into a Win-Win Solution

Iraq has seen its share of calamities in recent years, but none is as dangerous as the impending failure of the Mosul Dam. The dam, if it were to be breached, will result in a tsunami-like wave that would sweep through cities and hamlets along the Tigris River from Mosul to as far south as Amarah and even Basra. Baghdad would be submerged under five meters of water within four days of the breach of the dam.

Addressing Loss and Damage: Innovative Climate Finance Solutions

The world is entering a new phase of climate change defined by “failure to mitigate sufficiently and failure to adapt sufficiently,” said Saleemul Huq, director of the Bangladesh-based International Center for Climate Change and Development, at the Wilson Center on March 16.

Violence and Gender: The Other Side of Pakistan’s Urban Unrest

Much of the international focus on violence in Pakistan’s cities tends to revolve around terrorism perpetrated by Islamist extremist groups. In reality, a variety of other major factors drive violence in urban Pakistan as well—including issues associated with water access, waste disposal, transport, and drugs and alcohol. In these cases, gender considerations play a key role.

Rule of Law and the Environment: Rights, Resources, and Governance

On January 19, 2016, the University of South Carolina Rule of Law Collaborative, in cooperation with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, will host "Rule of Law and the Environment: Rights, Resources and Governance," a JusTRAC symposium that will focus on the intersection between rule of law issues and the environment. Discussion will focus on how rule of law plays a role in environmental harm and resource instability and how environment concerns and resource scarcity in turn create rule of law problems. The symposium will bring together leading figures from key U.S.

Lessons from the Development of Binational and Civil Society Cooperation on Water Management at the U.S.-Mexico Border

Mexico and the United States are partners in a number of agreements that imply joint management of natural resources and have had a long and productive history of sharing water resources. The two countries share water resources in the Colorado and Tijuana river basins, and in the Rio Grande basin; the joint utilization of their waters is defined by the Treaty of February 3, 1944 and its Minutes. 

Crossover: Urban Water, Transport, and Energy

On September 15, the Wilson Center’s Urban Sustainability Lab gathered a panel of urban experts to discuss “cross border” links in policy, technology, and practice that can help cities develop long-term integrated approaches to address urban challenges. Blair Ruble, Vice President for Programs and Director of the Urban Sustainability Lab, opened the discussion, making the case that new technologies offer a platform for moving governance forward and fostering sustainable change in the urban sphere.

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