Water

Dire Strait? Energy Security in the Strait of Malacca

An Asia Program Event, cosponsored by the Wilson Center's Division of International Security Studies and Environmental Change and Security Program; Georgetown University's Center for Peace and Security Studies; and the U.S. Army's Dwight D. Eisenhower National Security Series.

Rivers of the Amazon: Can They Be Used on a Sustainable Basis as a Source of Renewable Hydropower?

Are hydroelectric power plants the best approach to meet Brazil's energy demand? The construction of Jirau and Santo Antonio, two hydroelectric power plants on the Madeira River in the Western Amazon, sparked debate about how to balance energy production with environmental conservation.

Sugarcane Ethanol and Land Use in Brazil

A recent study sponsored by the German Marshall Fund and published in Science magazine has cast doubt on the environmental benefits of biofuels, calling attention to its potential negative impact when land-use is factored in the ca

Asia's Growing Crisis of Floods and Droughts

The Greater Himalayas, whose glaciers supply crucial seasonal water flows to some 40 percent of the world's population, are a climate change hot spot. The Tibetan Plateau has experienced a 1 degree Celsius temperature rise in the past decade alone and the 40,000+ glaciers in these mountains are in rapid retreat, posing grave environmental and human health threats. The prospect of catastrophic changes in normal season flows (sometimes too much, and at others times too little) from this Tibetan "water tower" is real.

ChokePoint U.S.: Understanding the Tightening Conflict Between Energy and Water in the Era of Climate Change

Without sharp changes in investment and direction, the current U.S. strategy to produce sufficient energy — including energy generated from clean sources — will lead to severe water shortages and cause potentially major damage to the country's environment and quality of life. These are the conclusions from a comprehensive reporting project presented at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars on Sept. 22, 2010.

Hidden Waters, Dragons in the Deep

In the southwest corner of China, a region of towering mountains, deep gorges, and scattered villages not far from the border of Vietnam is Shidong, the Rock Cave. It is here, 800 miles west of Hong Kong and the Pacific coast, in an area so remote that people typically settle in villages not larger than 300 residents, where the Yang Liu River disappears underground.

Asia's Next Challenge: Securing the Region's Water Future

The global demand for fresh water is soaring as supply becomes more uncertain. Water-related problems are particularly acute in Asia – the world's most populous continent. As population growth and urbanization rates in Asia continue to rise, stress on the region's water resources will intensify. Climate change is expected to worsen the situation.

Temperatures Rising: Climate Change, Water, and the Himalayas

The Himalayas in the Tibetan Plateau and Karakoram North Pakistan, whose glaciers supply water to some 40 percent of the world's population, are a climate change hotspot. The Tibetan Plateau has experienced a 1 degree Celsius temperature rise in the past decade alone. The 40,000+ glaciers in China's Himalayas are in rapid retreat, posing grave environmental and human health threats and the prospect of catastrophic water shortages.

China's Green Olympics: A Lasting Impact?

When Beijing made its bid for the 2008 Olympics, its air quality was vying with Mexico City as the most polluted capital in the world. Beijing ultimately won the bid over Toronto and Paris due to the extensive plans to make the 2008 Olympic Games green.

Environmental Health Crises in Southwest China

Millions of rural and urban citizens in China suffer from health problems and limits to economic development due to contamination or shortages of water and air pollution from coal. In southwest China, water challenges are particularly acute due to that region's karst geology, where much of the water flows underground through caves rather than on the surface. These health problems are yet another burden on tens of millions of subsistence farmers.

Pages