Water

The Double Edge of Legal Advocacy in Environmental Public Participation in China: Raising the Stakes and Strengthening Stakeholders

Drawing on the feature article they wrote for the China Environment Series 8, Allison Moore, American Bar Association and Adria Warren, Foley and Lardner, LLP, discussed the political and legal dynamics of the development of public participation in the environmental sphere in China.

Film Screening: China's Sorrow - Earth's Hope

Initiated in 1994 with funding and expertise provided by the World Bank and the International Development Association (IDA) , the Loess Plateau Watershed Rehabilitation Project successfully broke the cycle of environmental degradation and poverty in an area that had become known as the most eroded place on earth.

Film Screening: Dam or Damned? Documentary on China's Nujiang River

In southwest China the Salween River is named Nu Jiang, which means "River of Anger." It is one of the two rivers that still remains un-dammed in China. "Dam or Damned" examines how many environmentalists view this pristine river running through deep canyons with strings of rapids as a precious land hidden in a forgotten corner of southwestern China. But in the eyes of Chinese hydropower companies who are constantly seeking new sources of energy, the drastic drop of the rapids is a rare gift that shouldn't be left untapped.

Strengthening Watershed Management in Southwest China

The China Environment Forum is hosting Yu Xiaogang, founder of one of China's leading environmental NGOs Green Watershed and winner of the Goldman Environmental Prize 2006, to talk about his work on promoting citizen involvement with watershed management in Yunnan Province.

Beyond Pandas: Animal and Habitat Protection Activism in China

Nearly 20 percent of China's animals and plants are considered endangered from development pressures and pollution. While many conservation projects focus on panda preservation and nature reserve issues in western China, there are also Chinese and international NGOs working throughout China on protection of turtles, salamanders, sharks, and even marine habitats. This Wilson Center meeting will highlight some of the lesser-known initiatives to protect animals and their habitats.

Environmental Journalist Stops Plans to Dam China's Last Untamed River

Wang Yongchen, a reporter and producer for China National Radio and founder of Green Earth Volunteers, will speak at the Wilson Center's China Environmental Forum on Tuesday, October 12 at 9:00 a.m. Yongchen will talk about her efforts to expose the potential environmental damage from the government's proposal to dam China's last wild river.

Book Launch:The River Runs Black: The Environmental Challenge to China's Future

While the China Environment Forum has since 1997 held meetings and produced articles highlighting the myriad domestic and international efforts to resolve China's acute pollution and energy problems, few books have taken a comprehensive look at the historical and current causes of China's growing environmental crisis.

A Roundtable Discussion with SEPA Minister Xie Zhenhua

To be heard among a sea of voices advocating economic development before ecological concerns, environmental activists and academics in China generally must be hardworking and possess dynamic personalities. Dynamism and commitment to protecting the environment also is increasingly evident in some officials of China's State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA)—most notably in SEPA's minister Xie Zhenhua. Minister Xie sparked a candid and lively discussion at a December 9th meeting of the China Environment Forum.

A Land on Fire: The Environmental Consequences of the Southeast Asian Boom

Over the past two decades, Southeast Asia has been on fire, both figuratively and literally. Economies throughout the region have exploded, taking advantage of small production costs and a low-paid, highly motivated workforce. At the same time, to fuel rapid growth, forests have been stripped for lumber and the land torched for new agricultural opportunities. Indeed, economic success has often come at the expense of the environment and with sixty percent of the world's population, environmental degradation in Southeast Asia has potential worldwide effect.

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