Water

Helping Hands: An Integrated Approach

At the moment, the agendas of the growing population of people and the environment are too separate. People are thinking about one or the other," said Sir John Sulston, Nobel laureate and chair of the Institute for Science, Ethics, and Innovation at the University of Manchester, in an interview with the Environmental Change & Security Program(ECSP).

"People argue about, ‘Should we consume less or should we have fewer people?' The point is it's both. We need to draw it together. It's people and their activities."

Yemen Beyond the Headlines: Population, Health, Natural Resources, and Institutions

"Ultimately, whether Yemen is able to achieve its goals for social and economic development, will, to a large extent, depend on its future population growth and size," said Gary Cook, senior health advisor at the U.S. Agency for International Development, in his opening address at the Woodrow Wilson Center's all-day conference, "Yemen Behind the Headlines: Population, Health, Natural Resources, and Institutions."

Panel I: Population and Development Challenges

Managing the Planet's Freshwater

"The impact of human activities on the planet and on its biology has risen to a scale that deserves a commensurate response," said Tom Lovejoy, professor at George Mason University, introducing a discussion on "Managing the Planet's Freshwater," the second of a monthly series led jointly by George Mason University and the Woodrow Wilson Center. Karin M.

Changing Glaciers and Hydrology in Asia: Developing a Blueprint for Addressing Glacier Melt in the Region

"Glacier melt is part of larger hydrologic and climate systems, so effective programs will be cross-sectoral and yield co-benefits," said Elizabeth L. Malone, senior research scientist at the Joint Global Change Research Institute and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, speaking at the Wilson Center on November 16.

China Environment Series 11(2010/2011)

China's success in promoting clean energy technology has been a hot story over the past year as the China Environment Forum team pulled together this special Energy and Climate issue of the China Environment Series. We ambitiously aimed to create; and hope our readers think we succeeded;in creating an issue that takes a snapshot of major energy trends in China and understand some of the complexities in the U.S.-China energy and climate relations.

Daily Headlines: November 2010

China's environmental problems and the linkages to human health are increasingly making the news internationally. Most striking has been the growing number of reports from Chinese journalists on pollution and related health threats even after some government restrictions were put in place in late 2005 to limit reporting on sensitive pollution accidents.

The Inclusive City: Infrastructure and Public Services for the Urban Poor in Asia

Getting basic services—housing, transportation, trash disposal, water, and sanitation—poses almost unimaginable challenges to the urban poor of Asia. The Inclusive City provides case studies of how governmental programs attempt to meet these challenges by directly involving the poor themselves in improving their access to urban services through collaborative efforts. Case studies are drawn from the largest cities in India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, China (including Hong Kong), Indonesia, and the Philippines.

Brazil at a Crossroads: Repercussions of Embracing Genetically Modified Agriculture

The Brazil Project and Environmental Change and Security Program co-hosted a conference on the debate over genetically modified (GM) agriculture in Brazil.

Beyond Metropolis: The Planning and Governance of Asia's Mega-Urban Regions

Beyond Metropolis studies planning and governance in the regions surrounding the twelve cities in Asia with populations over ten million: Tokyo, Mumbai, Kolkata, Dhaka, Delhi, Shanghai, Jakarta, Osaka, Beijing, Karachi, Metro Manila, and Seoul. These regions are greater than cities plus suburbs: for almost all, development has sprawled into the surrounding countryside, enveloping villages, towns, and small and medium-sized cities, creating “extended metropolitan regions.”

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