Water

Yemen’s Other Crisis

Saudi Arabia is maintaining its air offensive in Yemen, and Houthi rebels continue to stage assaults. A humanitarian crisis appears imminent.

But another crisis is raging in Yemen that could pose an existential threat to one of the world’s most troubled nations.

Telling Tales of Complex Connections

Policy wonks and academics produce voluminous tomes on sustainability issues, but how to get these before a larger audience? One wonkish think tank hard at work on this problem, the Environmental Change and Security Program at the Woodrow Wilson Center, is producing a series of short films to tell the stories that move these concerns toward a wider audience. The idea is to take complex, interacting factors and show how they affect real people.

China’s Water-Energy-Food Roadmap: A New Global Choke Point Report

Broken Landscape: India’s Energy-Water Choke Point

Across the planet, two fundamental human needs --- energy and water --- often find themselves on a collision course. A new documentary looks at one such choke point in India, where coal mining and its negative environmental impact on water is the source of a regulatory battle with significant implications. We spoke with the filmmaker to learn more about this complex clash of needs. That’s the focus of this edition of  Wilson Center NOW.

Event Summary: Climate Change Adaptation, Urban Planning, and the Private Sector in Colombia

On February 25, 2015, the Wilson Center's Latin American Program and USAID/Colombia convened a full day seminar with leaders from Colombian govenment ministries and private sector firms to discuss climate change adaptation, urban planning, and the role of the role of the private sector. National and international experts and policymakers presented case studies, delivered expert presentations, and engaged with representitives of naitonal, regional, and municipal government from across Colombia, as well as private sector representatives.

Island Communities: Resilience in the Face of Climate Change

While there’s no doubt that rising sea levels and other implications of climate change pose serious threats to island nations, it is also true that such locales have much experience adapting to harsh environments. Roger-Mark De Souza suggests that we can learn from island communities and that they have the potential to be “champions of resilience.” That’s the focus of this edition of  Wilson Center NOW. 

Global Trends, Local Stories: New Films on India and Ethiopia

On March 24, the DC Environmental Film Festival comes to the Wilson Center for the Washington, DC, premieres of two new short documentaries from ECSP, “Broken Landscape” and “Paving the Way.” Filmmaker and ECSP Multimedia Producer Sean Peoples will describe his journey from the eroded gullies of Ethiopia to the rat-hole mines of northeastern India during a panel discussion led by the Wilson Center’s Roger-Mark De Souza, with observations from Sierra Club's Kim Lovell and World Resources Institute's Ferzina Banaji.
 
About the films:

Environmental Review in Canada and the United States

On March 18, the Wilson Center's Canada Institute hosted Helen Cutts, the vice-president for policy development for the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency, for a round table discussion on the environmental review process in Canada and the United States. Our expert panel gave views from both in and outside government on contrasting procedures, the role sub-federal governments play in the process, how both systems incorporate the needs of native groups into their decision making, and what role concerns about climate change should play in approving or rejecting a project.

Resilience for Peace: A New Agenda

As “resilience” builds as a theme for the development community, a few key concepts are rising to the top of the conversation.

CEF Associate, Susan Chan Shifflett, Interviewed by the Guardian on China’s Food Security and Safety

For the past three decades an onslaught of urban development, desertification, and pollution has been eating away at China’s once-endless sprawl of tiny farms. China is facing radical challenge to feed its large population. “You have urbanization — people travel abroad,” says Susan Chan Shifflett, China Environment Forum’s associate. “They go to France, they see cheese, and they think, ‘why can’t I have brie in China?’ They’re changing their diets — meat consumption has quadrupled over the past 30 years.”

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