Women's History | Wilson Center

Women's History

Jean Monnet and the Future of Europe

In her political biography of Jean Monnet, Sherrill Wells explains how this visionary and entrepreneurial internationalist who never held an elective office, never joined a political party, and never developed any significant popular following in his native France, became one of the most influential European statesmen in the 20th century. In this seminar talk she will cast further light on how Monnet worked with European and American leaders after World War II in establishing peace in war-ravaged Europe through economic integration.

Women Leaders and Emerging Leaders: A Force Multiplier

As the Council of Women World Leaders celebrates its 15th anniversary and a move to The Wilson Center, Finnish President Tarja Halonen, former Irish President Mary Robinson, and U.N. Special Representative Margot Wallstrom share their stories for the next generation.

 

"Dorothea Lange: Life, Politics, and Work": A lecture by Dr. Linda Gordon

Please join us for the third lecture in  “The Past, Present, and Future of U.S. Women’s History” lecture series, a joint venture between the The National Women’s History Museum (NWHM) and the Woodrow Wilson Center. This series is aimed at promoting the need for a national museum to focus on women’s lives  over the course of United States history. Our goal is to cover diverse topics in women’s history, explore leading scholarship and address the question, “Why women’s history?”

Making Homes, Building Bases: The Politics of Domesticity in the U.S. Occupation of Okinawa

 

Since the 1995 rape incident in Okinawa involving a 12-year-old girl and three American servicemen, the trope of masculine domination and feminine subjugation has shaped much of the discussion concerning the U.S. military presence there. However, as Wilson Center Japan Scholar Mire Koikari noted at an Asia Program event on November 28, gender has played a far more complex role in the relationship between the United States and Okinawa.

“Between Marketization and Social Protection: Ambivalences of Feminism in the Context of Capitalist Crisis”

Nancy Fraser is one of the leading political philosophers and feminist theorists practicing today. Her writing addresses issues of concern to a broad audience, including globalization, cosmopolitanism, identity politics, neoliberalism, the welfare state, and gender issues.

Why Latino/a History Matters to U.S. History: A lecture by Dr. Vicki Ruiz

Please join us for the inauguration of  “The Past, Present, and Future of U.S. Women’s History” lecture series, a joint venture between the
The National Women’s History Museum (NWHM) and the Woodrow Wilson Center. This series is aimed at promoting the need for a national museum to focus on women’s lives  over the course of United States history. Our goal is to cover diverse topics in women’s history, explore leading scholarship and address the question, “Why women’s history?”

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