Women's History | Wilson Center

Women's History

A Woman's Place is in the House: A Comparative Look at Women in Politics in the United States and Canada

Summary of a conference with Sylvia Bashevkin, professor, University of Toronto; Carolyn Bennett, member of Parliament (Canada); Rosemary Brown, former member of Legislative Assembly (British Columbia); Susan J. Carroll, Center for American Women and Politics, Rutgers University; Marilyn Dankner, National Federation of Republican Women; Elisabeth Gidengil, professor, McGill University; Mervat Hatem, professor, Howard University; Melissa Haussman, professor, Suffolk University; Ellen R.

Women, Politics, and Islam: The Case of Tunisia

Summary of a meeting cosponsored by the Middle East Project and Africa Project with Lilia Labidi, University of Tunis (Tunisia) and current Woodrow Wilson Center Fellow.

Building a New Iraq: Women's Role in Reconstruction

Iraq’s progress toward democracy has been marred by violence, delays in reconstruction, and only intermittent nurturing of civil society. Despite these formidable obstacles, many Iraqis labor tirelessly for peace and stability. Among those strongly committed to a more stable Iraq are the country’s women, who face an ongoing, uphill battle for political representation. In the face of challenges, women leaders remain committed to ensuring their voices are heard in the new Iraq.

Film Screening and Discussion: <i>God Sleeps in Rwanda</i>

Kimberlee Acquaro, filmmaker and photojournalist

Norah Bagarinkah, women's rights activist and genocide survivor

Moderators: Howard Wolpe, Director of the Africa Program and Louise Lieff, Deputy Director of the International Reporting Project

Women in Power in Post-Communist Parliaments

Women in Power in Post-Communist Parliaments examines the life and work of women who have reached positions of political power after the end of communism in Europe. It explores the roles they have adopted, the relationships they have cultivated, and the agendas they have pursued. In contrast to much of the literature on women in post-communist states, this volume treats the issues comparatively, in six countries with interesting differences—the Czech Republic, Germany (with a focus on parliamentarians from the former GDR), Slovenia, Bulgaria, Poland, and Russia.

Contemporary Women's Movements in Hungary: Globalization, Democracy, and Gender Equality

As the first and only book in any language on contemporary women’s movements in Hungary, this groundbreaking study focuses on the role of women’s activism in a society where women are not yet adequately represented by established parties and political institutions. Drawing on eyewitness accounts of meetings and protests, as well as first-person interviews with leading female activists, Katalin Fábián examines the interactions between women’s groups in Hungary and studies the unique brand of democracy they have forged in postcommunist Eastern Europe.

Religion, Morality, and Community in Post-Soviet Societies

In the post-Soviet environment of expanded civil freedom with great everyday uncertainty, unhappiness, injustice, and suffering, religious organizations and beliefs in Russia and Eurasia face numerous opportunities and intense challenges. Based on recent research and interdisciplinary methodologies, this volume examines how religious organizations and individuals engage the changing and troubled environment in which they live. The contributions investigate not just Russian Orthodoxy, but also Old Belief, Judaism, Islam, Buriat shamanism, and Catholicism.

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