Wilson Center News

Latest News from the Wilson Center

Latin American Program on the news: Why would Colombia's FARC sell cows?

Jan 25, 2012
"FARC has been under unrelenting military pressure for over a decade," said Cynthia Arnson, the director of the Latin American Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington. "But FARC is still an enormously wealthy insurgent organization because of revenues from the drug trade. It still retains a capacity to commit acts of violence and harm people."

Call for Papers: European Summer School on Cold War History

Jan 25, 2012
Fourth Annual European Summer School on Cold War History at the Università di Trento, 5-8 September 2012
People stand on a bridge overlooking the river Nile.

Return to Tahrir Square: Political Uncertainty, Military Unrest Color Protests

Jan 24, 2012
Egyptians mark the first anniversary of the revolution that toppled former dictator Hosni Mubarak—an uprising centering on Cairo’s iconic square that prompted hopes of a new and democratic politics. Just back from a research trip to Egypt, Distinguished Scholar Robin Wright gives a first-hand impression of the country’s political situation, reporting on protests against the military and the recent parliamentary elections.

Mexico Institute in the News: Sempra Energy gains speed on Mexico wind energy plant

Jan 23, 2012
An area in Mexico called La Rumorosa has strong wind a San Diego company plans on using for electricity.

Latin American Program on the News: After 20 years of peace, Salvadorans in D.C. still worry about their homeland

Jan 23, 2012
Cynthia J. Arnson, director of the Latin American Program at the Woodrow Wilson Center for Scholars, said Salvadoran expatriates play a critical role by sending remittances home, but that is not enough. El Salvador needs people to help build the economy and provide education and job opportunities to keep people out of gangs, she said. “As important as the remittances are to subsidize consumption, [it] is not the same as creating productive capacity, and there is a huge role for the Salvadoran community living in the United States and other countries to contribute to their homeland by creating economic opportunity,” Arnson said. “It is a vicious cycle and, unless people who are in a position to provide capital for the economic growth and job creation [also provide help], it is very hard to see how the country will ever break this cycle.”

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