60 Years of Atoms for Peace

Vienna, 6 December 2013 | 6 p.m.
Bruno Kreisky Forum for International Dialogue

On 8 December 1953, U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower proposed the establishment of an organization for the peaceful use of atomic energy in his famous “Atoms for Peace” speech to the United Nations General Assembly. Eisenhower’s proposal eventually led to the founding of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in 1957, the oldest and largest international organization in Vienna/Austria. Even today, Eisenhower’s “Atoms for Peace” speech remains at the heart of debates over nuclear energy and non-proliferation.

The panel discussion on “60 Years of Atoms for Peace” is organized by the IAEA History Research Project (Department of Contemporary History, University of Vienna) in cooperation with the Nuclear Proliferation International History Project (Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Washington D.C.). The discussion will be held off-site at the Bruno Kreisky Forum for International Dialogue on 6 December 2013 at 6 p.m. For more information, please contact Magdalena Reitbauer.


Panelists:

JOESEPH F. PILAT, Program Manager, Los Alamos Laboratory; Global Fellow and Co-Director, Non-Proliferation Forum, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

ODETTE JANKOWITSCH, Lecturer on international nuclear law; former Head of Section IAEA Division for External Relation and Senior Legal Officer IAEA Office of Legal Affairs

ELISABETH RÖHRLICH, Researcher and Lecturer, IAEA History Research Project, Department of Contemporary History, University of Vienna

Chair:

OLIVER RATHKOLB, Professor, Department of Contemporary History, University of Vienna, Head of the IAEA History Research Project


Please RSVP by contacting:

Magdalena Reitbauer
Department of Contemporary History
University of Vienna
Spitalgasse 2–4 / Hof 1
A–1090 Vienna
Magdalena.Reitbauer@univie.ac.at