Current Releases

Atoms for Peace: A Future after Fifty Years?, edited by Joseph F. Pilat

Atoms for Peace: A Future after Fifty Years?

The twenty-five contributors to Atoms for Peace grapple in many ways with the past, present, and future of nuclear proliferation, nuclear terrorism, and the future of nuclear energy. 

The Inclusive City: Infrastructure and Public Services for the Urban Poor in Asia, edited by Aprodicio A. Laquian, Vinod Tewari, and Lisa M. Hanley

The Inclusive City: Infrastructure and Public Services for the Urban Poor in Asia

Getting basic services—housing, transportation, trash disposal, water, and sanitation—poses almost unimaginable challenges to the urban poor of Asia. The Inclusive City provides case studies of how governmental programs attempt to meet these challenges by directly involving the poor themselves in improving their access to urban services through collaborative efforts.

Rebounding Identities: The Politics of Identity in Russia and Ukraine, edited by Dominique Arel and Blair A. Ruble

Rebounding Identities: The Politics of Identity in Russia and Ukraine

An examination of post-Soviet society through ethnic, religious, and linguistic criteria, Rebounding Identities turns what is typically anthropological subject matter into the basis of politics, sociology, and history.

Toward a Society under Law: Citizens and Their Police in Latin America, edited by Joseph S. Tulchin and Meg Ruthenburg

Toward a Society under Law: Citizens and Their Police in Latin America

Toward a Society under Law covers issues of crime and police in Latin America, with chapters on the impact of community policing, the role of advocacy networks, urban social policies and crime, and the cost of crime. It also includes case studies of police reform, community policing, Argentina’s national plan for crime prevention, and crime in Mexico City.

Reins of Liberation: An Entangled History of Mongolian Independence, Chinese Territoriality, and Great Power Hegemony, 1911-1950 by Xiaoyuan Liu

Reins of Liberation: An Entangled History of Mongolian Independence, Chinese Territoriality, and Great Power Hegemony, 1911-1950

Author(s)
Xiaoyuan Liu

Xiaoyuan Liu uses the Mongolian question to illuminate how war, revolution, and great-power rivalries induce or restrain the formation of nationhood and territoriality. He argues that on its way to building a communist state, the CCP was confronted by fundamental issues of China’s transition to nation-statehood.

Behind the Bamboo Curtain: China, Vietnam, and the World beyond Asia, edited by Priscilla Roberts

Behind the Bamboo Curtain: China, Vietnam, and the World beyond Asia

Based on new archival research in many countries, this volume broadens the context of the U.S. intervention in Vietnam, with a primary focus on relations between China and Vietnam in the mid-twentieth century.

The Three Yugoslavias: State-Building and Legitimation, 1918-2005 by Sabrina P. Ramet

The Three Yugoslavias: State-Building and Legitimation, 1918-2005

Author(s)
Sabrina P. Ramet

In this thematic history of modern Yugoslavia, Sabrina Ramet demonstrates that the instability of the three 20th-century Yugoslav states can be attributed to the failure of succeeding governments to establish the rule of law and political legitimacy.

The Toothpaste of Immortality: Self-Construction in the Consumer Age by Elemér Hankiss

The Toothpaste of Immortality: Self-Construction in the Consumer Age

Author(s)
Elemer Hankiss

This lively and insightful account reveals the profound ways in which everyday acts and artifacts of consumer civilization shape our sense of self.

Failed Illusions: Moscow, Washington, Budapest, and the 1956 Hungarian Revolt by Charles Gati

Failed Illusions: Moscow, Washington, Budapest, and the 1956 Hungarian Revolt

Author(s)
Charles Gati

The 1956 Hungarian revolution was a key event in the Cold War, demonstrating deep dissatisfaction with both the communist system and Soviet imperialism. Fifty years later, the simplicity of this David and Goliath story should be revisited, according to Charles Gati’s new history of the revolt.

Sino-Japanese Relations: Interaction, Logic, and Transformation by Ming Wan

Sino-Japanese Relations: Interaction, Logic, and Transformation

Author(s)
Ming Wan

In Sino-Japanese Relations, Ming Wan argues that the relationship between China and Japan is politically dispute-prone, cyclical, and downward-trending but manageable; militarily uncertain; economically integrating; psychologically closer in people-to-people contact yet more distant.

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