Current Releases

Taking Stock: American Government in the Twentieth Century, edited by Morton Keller and R. Shep Melnick

Taking Stock: American Government in the Twentieth Century

This work brings together eminent historians and political scienties to examine the past experience, current state, and future prospects of five major American public issues: trade and tariff policy, immigration and aliens, conservation and environmentalism, civil rights, and social welfare.

Reading Mixed Signals: Ambivalence in American Public Opinion about Government by Albert H. and Susan Davis Cantril

Reading Mixed Signals: Ambivalence in American Public Opinion about Government

Author(s)
Susan Davis Cantril, Albert H. Cantril

Based on a national public opinion survey, this book takes a wide-ranging look at what lies beyond the paradox that what people say about government as a general matter is often at odds with what they actually want it to do.

Strategic Balance and Confidence Building Measures in the Americas, edited by Joseph S. Tulchin and Francisco Rojas Aravena

Strategic Balance and Confidence Building Measures in the Americas

This book asserts that the creation of a framework for regional cooperation will depend on the establishment of the local level of confidence building measures. It evaluates the potential roles of such international organizations as the Organization of American States and the Inter-American Defense Board, and studies the changing regional policies of the United States for their effectiveness and impact on regional security.

Paradoxes of Democracy: Fragility, Continuity, and Change by S. N. Eisenstadt

Paradoxes of Democracy: Fragility, Continuity, and Change

Author(s)
S. N. Eisenstadt

Paradoxes of Democracy is an essay on the inherent weaknesses and surprising strengths of democratic government by one of the most productive and learned scholars in the social sciences. 

Welfare Reform: A Race to the Bottom? edited by Sanford F. Schram and Samuel H. Beer

Welfare Reform: A Race to the Bottom?

These essays on welfare reform by the most prominent scholars in the field canvas the issues both theoretically and empirically. The contributors present the pro and con arguments and assess the effects on related programs, as well as the prospects for poor mothers and their families.

The Quest for Sustained Growth: Southeast Asian and Southeast European Cases

The Quest for Sustained Growth: Southeast Asian and Southeast European Cases

Author(s)
Barry M. Hager, Paul Tibbitts, Karen Zietlow, Keith Crane, Samuel Wells

This report, based on the results of a September 1998 conference at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, assesses the effects of the “Washington Consensus” on liberalizing markets in Southeast Asian and Southeast Europe in pursuit of sustained economic growth in the 1990s.

India and Pakistan: The First Fifty Years, edited by Selig S. Harrison, Paul H. Kreisberg, and Dennis Kux

India and Pakistan: The First Fifty Years

The independence of India and Pakistan signaled the beginning of the end of Western colonialism. The fiftieth anniversary of that independence, in 1997, offered an excellent milestone for considering their progress, problems, and prospects. For this purpose, nine well-known specialists presented papers at a conference at the Wilson Center in June 1997.

At the End of the American Century: America's Role in the Post-Cold War World, edited by Robert L. Hutchings

At the End of the American Century: America's Role in the Post-Cold War World

Robert L. Hutchings brings together a distinguished group of authorities to review essential questions of morality, interest, politics, and economics in U.S. foreign policy after the collapse of the Soviet empire. 

Race, Self-Employment, and Upward Mobility: An Illusive American Dream by Timothy Bates

Race, Self-Employment, and Upward Mobility: An Illusive American Dream

Author(s)
Timothy Bates

Timothy Bates refutes conventional notions about entrepreneurship with a wealth of unimpeachable data. He finds that self-employment and upward mobility are open to those who are highly educated and skilled, often possessing significant personal financial resources. This is true among Asian Americans, African Americans, and everybody else.

 In the Face of the Facts: Moral Inquiry in American Scholarship, edited by Richard Wightman Fox and Robert B. Westbrook

In the Face of the Facts: Moral Inquiry in American Scholarship

This collection of accessible essays affords a view of the current state of moral inquiry in the American academy, and it offers fresh departures for ethically informed, interdisciplinary scholarship. The authors aim to foster discussion about inquiry and moral judgment, and demonstrate that moral inquiry need not be either dispassionate and value-free or moralistic and preachy.

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