Events

The Origins of China's "Reform and Opening-up" and High-level Politics

November 02, 2015 // 10:00am11:30am
It has long been assumed that China’s “Reform and Opening-up” started in 1978 when the Third plenum of the 11th Congress of the Chinese Communist Party was convened. In actuality, reform measures were initiated in 1977. In 1977, to promote reform, China’s top leadership made the decision to import advanced foreign technology and equipment. In this sense, reform was stimulated by opening-up.

Northeast Asian Dynamism and the U.S.-R.O.K. Alliance: Past, Present, Future

September 15, 2015 // 9:30am6:30pm
The dynamism of Northeast Asian markets, China’s rise, and Japan’s quest of normal state and economic power, play key roles in determining the future of the U.S.-R.O.K. alliance. At the same time, U.S. perception of China’s growing influence differs from that of Korea’s. Similarly, Washington does not see eye-to-eye with Seoul over changes in Japan’s policies. While the bilateral alliance remains strongest in dealing with North Korea, there are differences of views and challenges to it.

Luncheon Address by Chairman Kim Moo-Sung

July 27, 2015 // 12:00pm2:00pm
Rep. Kim Moo-Sung, Chairman of the Korean Saenuri Party (New Frontier Party) addressed a luncheon of invited experts and distinguished guests and discussed the US-ROK alliance and national unification on the occasion of the sixty-second anniversary of the Korean War armistice.
Webcast

Seeking Historical Reconciliation: The U.S. Role in Fostering Relations Between Japan and South Korea

July 23, 2015 // 10:30am12:00pm
Democratic ideals and cultural exchanges among nations have been seen as effective tools to encourage reconciliation between former adversaries. But that seemingly has not been the case in relations between Japan and South Korea, even if democratic values are shared. Wilson Center Fellow and Waseda University professor Toyomi Asano notes that it is important to share memories of the United States-led process of decolonization after the Japanese Empire’s defeat.

Cold War Crucible: The Korean Conflict and the Postwar World

June 25, 2015 // 9:00am10:30am
Masuda Hajimu will discuss his new book, Cold War Crucible: The Korean Conflict and the Postwar World, asking, what, really, was the Cold War?
Webcast

Wilson Center Announces New Center for Korean History and Public Policy

June 10, 2015 // 3:00pm4:00pm
Please join us on June 10 to celebrate the launch of the new Hyundai Motor–Korea Foundation Center for Korean History and Public Policy. Made possible with the generous support of the Hyundai Motor Company and the Korea Foundation, the program will expand the Wilson Center's unique strengths and rich legacy of substantive and diverse programming on Korea.

Ode To My Father: Korean War & Divided Families

June 03, 2015 // 5:30pm9:30pm
This very special screening of "Ode To My Father: Korean War & Divided Families" is held in support of legislation encouraging family reunions between Korean-Americans and North Koreans (H.CON.RES 40) and to strengthen the US-ROK alliance.

Bursting the Plutonium Bubble: How Utopian Communities Made Dystopian Nuclear Landscapes

May 18, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Historian Kate Brown draws on official records and dozens of interviews to tell the extraordinary stories of Richland, Washington and Ozersk, Russia – the first two cities in the world to produce plutonium. To contain secrets, American and Soviet leaders created plutopias – communities of nuclear families living in highly-subsidized, limited-access atomic cities. Brown shows that the plants' segregation of permanent and temporary workers and of nuclear and non-nuclear zones created a bubble of immunity, where dumps and accidents were glossed over and plant managers freely embezzled and polluted.

The Swastika Epidemic: Global Antisemitism and Human Rights Activism in the Cold War 1960s

May 11, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
Antisemitism is on the rise today in Europe and around the world, but there is no consensus about how the global community should respond. In this talk, drawn from his forthcoming book, scholar James Loeffler offers a historical perspective on this debate by looking back on the first major episode of global antisemitic violence after World War II, the “Swastika Epidemic” of 1960.

The Reagan Era: From a "New Cold War" to the "Washington Consensus"

May 04, 2015 // 4:00pm5:30pm
In "The Reagan Era," Doug Rossinow gives a full and rounded view of how the foreign policies of Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush took America—through a sometimes chaotic path, one marked with war scares, troop deployments, indirect warfare, scandal, and diplomatic triumphs—to the edge of a new era of American predominance.

Pages

Experts & Staff

  • Christian F. Ostermann // Director, History and Public Policy Program; Global Europe; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project
  • Pieter Biersteker // Editorial Assistant
  • Laura Deal // Catalog Specialist
  • Charles Kraus // Program Associate
  • Evan Pikulski // Program Assistant
  • James Person // Deputy Director, History and Public Policy Program; Cold War International History Project; North Korea Documentation Project; Nuclear Proliferation International History Project