Africa Publications

Tackling the South Sudan Conflict within a Complicated Regional Security Complex

Oct 16, 2015
The civil war in South Sudan, characterized by ongoing violence and broken ceasefires, is, for the moment, paused by a tenuous peace agreement. To make it stick, the need for regional mediation and international pressure is greater than ever. In this policy brief, Southern Voices Network Scholar Getachew Zeru Gebrekidan, examines the key role IGAD--a regional group composed of Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Sudan, and Uganda--has played in the peace process and recommends greater coordination between IGAD, the U.S., and other key international stakeholders and deeper engagement in the peace process.

Paper: "The U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit One Year On: Progress, Challenges, and the Way Forward for Economic Relations"

Sep 17, 2015
This paper by Dr. Witney Schneidman assesses progress and challenges since last year’s U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit and offers recommendations for the way forward for U.S.-Africa economic engagement.

Making Africa Less Corrupt

Sep 11, 2015
Although Botswana ranked 31st of 174 countries on the latest version of Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI), and Cape Verde (42th), Seychelles (43rd), Mauritius (47th), and Lesotho, Namibia, and Rwanda (all 55th) followed with comparatively high scores, 22 African countries are among the 50 lowest performing in the world on both the CPI and the comparable World Bank Control of Corruption (WBCC) indicator. Rwanda and Liberia (94th on the CPI) are among countries that have dramatically reduced corruption, and their examples demonstrate how committed leadership can reduce corrupt practices and enhance prosperity, economic growth, and positive priorities.

Strengthening Africa's Security Governance: Are We Reaching Take-Off Velocity?

Jun 23, 2015
Africa Program Global Fellow Dr. James A. Schear analyzes the Security Governance Initiative (SGI) which was announced at last year's U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit. Schear discusses the aspects of the SGI which he foresees as being the most challenging to implement.
Urban Opportunities: Perspectives on Climate Change, Resilience, and Inclusion

Urban Opportunities: Perspectives on Climate Change, Resilience, and Inclusion

Jan 29, 2015
This publication marks the 5th year of the Urban Poverty Paper Competition for advanced graduate students sponsored by the Wilson Center's Urban Sustainability Laboratory, USAID, International Housing Coalition, the World Bank, and Cities Alliance. The volume includes original, solutions-oriented research by winning authors to assess existing urban policy and practice.

Regional and Global Energy Series

Jan 27, 2015
The Wilson Center's new Regional and Global Energy Series addresses the growing debate on international energy issues in their security, political, economic, and environmental dimensions.

The Hybridization of Security Sector Governance for Peace-Building and State-Building In Somalia

Nov 05, 2014
"The collapse of the Somali central government and the ensuing anarchy resulted in major insecurity that compelled the indigenous population to seek alternative means to safeguard its livelihood. This led to the proliferation of non-state security actors, the rise in their legitimacy, and the emergence of hybridized security sector governance. This paper argues for the use of hybridized security governance to consolidate peace and state building in contemporary Somalia and gives insight into how neighboring countries and the international community might support Somali efforts to preserve peace. It suggests that the Somalia Federal Government should decentralize security sector governance and integrate traditional justice remedies and local militias into the governance structure with well-articulated roles and a system of accountability."

Addressing Religious Violence in sub-Saharan Africa

Sep 01, 2014
Recent events in several sub-Saharan African countries raise concerns that religiously motivated violent conflict is on the rise. Perpetrated mainly by a number of extremist religious groups claiming Islamic or Christian identity, which has escalated during the last decade, this phenomenon is becoming one of the main challenges to peace and security on the African continent and requires renewed attention from policymakers at the national and international levels. The U.S. government (USG) should pay particular attention given the United States’ commitment to religious freedom, as exemplified in its adoption of the International Religious Freedom Act in 1998. Addressing the issue of religious violence in sub-Saharan Africa requires not only a multi-level policy approach, but also the development of a holistic framework that will enable analysts and scholars to address the complexity of its causality, since religious violence is never only about religion.