Environment Publications

ECSP Report 1: Feature Articles

Jul 07, 2011
Includes table of contents, feature articles, and excerpts from official statements and documents.

Migration as the Demographic Wild Card in Civil Conflict: Mauritius and Fiji

Jul 07, 2011
Analyzing demographic trends on the small-island nations of Mauritius and Fiji, Christian Leuprecht argues that "the impact of migration on conflict is a man-made problem; the way migration is managed (or not) can determine its potential for mitigating or escalating a conflict."

ECSP Report 11: Reviews of New Publications

Jul 07, 2011
Experts review new publications.

A Paper on Global Conflict Transformation and the Emerging Community: The Case of Il-Laikipiak Maasai Pastoralists of Kenya

Jul 07, 2011
Paper contribution to January 2010 seminar on environmental peacebuilding.

Population, Migration, and Water Conflicts in the Pangani River Basin, Tanzania

Jul 07, 2011
The author describes how population growth and migration in Tanzania’s Pangani River basin—arguably the most waterstressed basin in the country—have intensified local water conflicts.

ECSP Report 8: Reviews of New Publications

Jul 07, 2011
Experts review new publications.

Finding the Source: Exploring the Population/Water Resources Nexus in the Developing World

Jul 07, 2011
This article explores the population/water resources nexus by using empirical examples from Africa in order to isolate some of the strategically important issues that policymakers should recognize.

PECS News Issue 7 (Fall 2002)

Jul 07, 2011
PECS News Issue 7 includes articles by Frederick Meyerson and Geoff Dabelko, and a report from the field from the Peruvian Andes.

Beyond Disasters: Creating Opportunities for Peace

Jul 07, 2011
Beyond Disasters: Creating Opportunities for Peace examines the impact of natural disasters on conflicts by analyzing the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the 2005 earthquake in Kashmir.

From Environmental Peacemaking to Environmental Peacekeeping

Jul 07, 2011
While it is still not clear if environmental cooperation can lead directly to peace, we should explore the environment’s potential as a peacemaking tool in this increasingly unstable and conflictual world, writes Erika Weinthal.

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