Global Governance Publications

How Should America Respond to Economic Opportunities in Africa?

Feb 07, 2013
U.S. policy toward Africa has been on autopilot for much of the past four years, following a laundry list of good intentions that established priorities for Africa’s well-being and U.S. security interests. However, a truly sustainable and forward-looking U.S. policy toward Africa should refocus attention on Africa’s opportunity as an economic powerhouse of the future, a strategy that combines both domestic self-interest and an opportunity to help Africa move forward.

Pursuing A Productive Relationship Between the U.S. and Brazil

Dec 03, 2012
The growing presence of Brazilian global companies in the United States complements traditionally strong investments by U.S. companies in Brazil. This trend has created a two-way street where common interests are more visible and both governments are pressured to recognize the benefits of working together or risk paying a political price for not doing so.
The Islamists Are Coming: Who They Really Are, edited by Robin Wright

The Islamists Are Coming: Who They Really Are

Apr 26, 2012
The Islamists Are Coming is the first book to survey the rise of Islamist groups in the wake of the Arab Spring. Often lumped together, the more than 50 Islamist parties with millions of followers now constitute a whole new spectrum—separate from either militants or secular parties. They will shape the new order in the world’s most volatile region more than any other political bloc. Yet they have diverse goals and different constituencies. Sometimes they are even rivals.

Moving Targets: Youth Priorities and the Policy Response in War and Post-War Africa

Apr 16, 2012
Unprecedented numbers of young people in weak and war-torn African nations, in short, tend to be characterized by the gap between what most youth need and what governments and international donors think they need, not to mention what they actually get.
Book Cover of China Orders the World: Normative Soft Power and Foreign Policy, edited by William A. Callahan and Elena Barabantseva

China Orders the World: Normative Soft Power and Foreign Policy

Jan 31, 2012
This volume examines a series of complex debates surrounding the role of China’s historical ideals in shaping its foreign policy. Presenting and analyzing the works of key Chinese philosophers and prominent international relations theorists, the contributors examine how an idealized version of China’s imperial past now inspires a new generation of Chinese scholars and policymakers and their plans for China’s future.

ECSP Report 9: Official Statements

Jul 07, 2011
Excerpts from recent official statements that prominently cite environment, population, health, and human security issues in the context of national and security interests.

ECSP Report 4: Update and Resources

Jul 07, 2011
This update section highlights the environment, population, and security activities of foundations, nongovernmental organizations, academic programs, and government offices, and includes a list of Internet sites and forums which may facilitate research and policy efforts.

PECS News Issue 6 (Spring 2002)

Jul 07, 2011
PECS News Issue 6 features a field report from the Philippines and a summary of the conference, The Road to Johannesburg.

Religion, Culture, and Society: The Case of Cuba

Jul 07, 2011
Participants at the conference that produced this publication explored the applicability of the predominant analytical models used to comprehend the interaction of religion, culture and society. This was accompanied by an exploration of concepts of civil society, together with a review of the history of associationalism in Cuba and the impact of diasporas on Cuban identity.

295. European Integration and Ethnic Reconciliation in Croatia and Serbia

Jul 07, 2011
December 2003 - Barely one week before the European Union's biggest enlargement ever on May 1, 2004, the European Commission gave Croatia the green light to open formal accession negotiations for EU membership. Croatian Prime Minister Ivo Sanader toasted the news with champagne in Zagreb, declaring: "Today we turn a new page in history." The Commission's decision is a remarkable turnaround for a country that was mired in violent conflict a decade ago and diplomatically isolated for most of the 1990s. It is significant as well that Sanader, elected in December 2003 when the Croatian Democratic Union (CDU) resumed power, celebrates this historic moment. The nationalist policies of his party's founder, Franjo Tudman, thwarted Croatia's European aspirations throughout the 1990s. CDU leaders and their supporters continued in recent years to undermine the previous regime's commitment to meeting EU conditions, namely turning over indicted war criminals to the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). The election of the CDU in December 2003 thus provided an important test for whether changes brought about by the EU's accession process are enduring. By fulfilling his pledge to make a clear and determined effort to enter the EU, even at the expense of marginalizing nationalist factions, Sanader appears to have turned a new page.

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