International Security Publications

Exploring Nuclear Latency

Feb 25, 2015
Nuclear latency can be viewed as the possession of many or all of the technologies, facilities, materials, expertise (including tacit knowledge), resources and other capabilities necessary for the development of nuclear weapons, without full operational weaponization. This workshop report explores the relationship between nuclear latency and contemporary nonproliferation efforts, including historical case studies.

China in Space: How Europe and the United States Can Align Their Views and Boost Cooperation

Feb 12, 2015
The European Union, through a series of collaborative projects, has built a relationship of trust with China regarding civilian uses of space. The United States, however, has withheld cooperation with China on space technology, and the U.S.-Chinese relationship has been characterized by mistrust. The transatlantic allies should create avenues for U.S.-European dialogue about China and space, and should also work on joint projects to establish standards for uses of space that all three parties can respect.

Forecasting Nuclear War

Nov 13, 2014
Between 1981 and 1989 the foreign intelligence branches of the Soviet KGB and the East German Ministry of State Security launched a combined effort to develop a system for detecting signs of an impending western nuclear first strike. Codenamed “Project RYaN”, this early-warning system constituted one part of the Soviet response to the perceived threat of a surprise “decapitation” strike by NATO nuclear forces.

Weapons Are Not the Answer to Ukraine’s Military Woes

Oct 09, 2014
Ukraine’s military, recently defeated in its Anti-Terrorist Operation against separatists in the east, must address massive materiel, training, and leadership deficiencies. Having suffered years of budgetary and administrative neglect, its armed forces and defense industrial complex cannot hope to fight Russia in their current state. U.S. security assistance to Ukraine should focus in the short term on supplies to sustain its troops over the winter and in the medium term on support for comprehensive military reform, but providing American weapons would engender a proxy war with Russia without really improving Ukraine’s combat capability.

Issue Brief #3: The Breach: Ukraine's Territorial Integrity and the Budapest Memorandum

Sep 30, 2014
Mariana Budjeryn investigates the security assurances made by the United States and Russia to Ukraine after the fall of the Soviet Union. These assurances, inscribed in the so-called “Budapest Memorandum” were designed to encourage Ukraine to ratify START I—otherwise known as the Lisbon Protocol—and return their entire nuclear arsenal to Russia for dismantling.
Terrorism in Cyberspace: The Next Generation by Gabriel Weimann

Terrorism in Cyberspace: The Next Generation

Sep 10, 2014
The war on terrorism has not been won, Gabriel Weimann argues in Terrorism in Cyberspace, the successor to his seminal 2006 book, Terror on the Internet. Weimann’s book looks at terrorism’s online reach, recent trends, future threats, and ways to mitigate or counter Internet terrorism.

Japan's Vision For East Asia

Apr 07, 2014
As questions about U.S. commitment to its rebalance to the Asia-Pacific region remain, how Japan sees its own role in East Asia continues to evolve. The changing nature of Tokyo’s relations with Beijing and Seoul, and Japan’s internal debate about whether it should become a “normal” country with greater defense capabilities are among some key issues discussed in the Wilson Center’s latest publication.
Track-Two Diplomacy toward an Israeli-Palestinian Solution, 1978–2014 by Yair Hirschfeld

Track-Two Diplomacy toward an Israeli-Palestinian Solution, 1978–2014

Feb 12, 2014
Track-Two Diplomacy toward an Israeli-Palestinian Solution, 1978–2014 is an important insider account of a crucial set of negotiations aimed at settling a seemingly endless conflict.
The Sino-Russian Challenge to the World Order: National Identities, Bilateral Relations, and East versus West in the 2010s by Gilbert Rozman

The Sino-Russian Challenge to the World Order: National Identities, Bilateral Relations, and East versus West in the 2010s

Jan 28, 2014
The Sino-Russian Challenge argues that China and Russia’s national identities are much closer to each other than usually thought. The closeness of their identities comes neither from prerevolutionary pasts nor from today’s practical politics, but rather from habits carried over from their communist periods.

Jihadist Violence: The Indian Threat

Dec 30, 2013
A new study by Prof. Stephen Tankel on militancy in India. Prof. Tankel's main focus is a loosely organized indigenous Islamist militant network known as the Indian Mujahideen.

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