International Security Publications

Missing Women and Bare Branches: Gender Balance and Conflict

Jul 07, 2011
The authors ask whether societies with an abnormal ratio between men and women are less secure.

ECSP Report 2

Jul 07, 2011
In the 1996 issue of ECSP's annual report, Miriam R. Lowi writes about water disputes in the Middle East; Dennis Pirages explores "microsecurity"; and Thomas Homer-Dixon discusses findings from a project on environment, population, and security. Complete report.

ECSP Report 7: Reviews of New Publications

Jul 07, 2011
Experts review new publications.

From Planting Trees to Making Peace: The Next Steps for Environment, Population, and Security

Jul 07, 2011
Complete set of commentaries on the future of environmental security by Geoffrey D. Dabelko, Jared Diamond, Margaret Brusasco-Mackenzie, Erika Weinthal, Richard Cincotta, Roger-Mark De Souza, Richard Matthew, and Bryan McDonald.

Chapter Three: Early Warning and Assessment of Environment, Conflict, and Cooperation

Jul 07, 2011
Marc Levy and Patrick Philippe Meier recommend that assessments and early warning systems integrate environmental variables more completely and effectively. The authors assert that the international system has little capacity to monitor and assess conflict and cooperation on environmental issues.

ECSP Report 13

Jul 07, 2011
The 13th issue of the Environmental Change and Security Program Report details the non-traditional security threats and opportunities facing the world today. Complete report.

ECSP Report 6: Official Statements

Jul 07, 2011
Below are excerpts from recent official statements in which environment and population issues are prominently cited in the context of security and national interests.

Commentary: Should Global Poverty be a U.S. National Security Issue? (Part 1)

Jul 07, 2011
ECSP invited analysts to address whether global poverty should and can be a U.S. national security issue.

Climate Change, Demography, Environmental Degradation, and Armed Conflict

Jul 07, 2011
Using geo-referenced data, Clionadh Raleigh and Henrik Urdal find that population growth and density are related to increased civil conflict, but that demographic and environmental factors are generally outweighed by political and economic ones.

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