Migration Publications

PECS News Issue 1 (Fall 1999)

Jul 07, 2011
The first issue of PECS News features an article on population dynamics and migration in the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve in Mexico by University of Michigan Fellows Program Associate Jenny Ericson.

Seguridad y Defensa en America del Norte: Nuevos dilemas geopolíticos

Jul 07, 2011
The book's authors collaborate to put forth an analysis of North American national defense policies and their implications on transnational and border security. Issues of migration and organized crime are touched upon, providing readers with an greater, in-depth understanding of security problems faced by the region as a whole.

Today We March, Tomorrow We Vote: Latino Migrant Civic Engagement in L.A.

Jul 07, 2011
This report is part of a series on Latin American immigrant civic and political participation that looks at eight cities around the United States: Charlotte, NC; Chicago, IL; Fresno, CA; Las Vegas, NV; Los Angeles, CA; Omaha, NE; Tucson, AZ; and Washington, DC. The reports on each city describe the opportunities and barriers that Latino immigrants face in participating as civic and political actors in cities around the United States.

New Directions in Demographic Security

Jul 07, 2011
Complete set of commentaries on demographic security by Jack Goldstone, Richard Cincotta, Jennifer Dabbs Sciubba, Clionadh Raleigh and Henrik Urdal, Christian Leuprecht, and Elizabeth Leahy.

Too Poor for Peace? Global Poverty, Conflict, and Security in the 21st Century

Jul 07, 2011
The book’s broad thesis is that alleviating poverty in the 21st century is not only a moral but also a security imperative.

ECSP Report 8: Bibliography

Jul 07, 2011
Literature that has come to the attention of ECSP in the past year on population, environmental change, and security issues.

Evolving Demographic and Human-Capital Trends in Mexico and Central America and Their Implications For Regional Migration

May 01, 2011
As the US labor force became better educated, fewer native workers accepted many of the low-wage but essential jobs at the bottom of the labor market. These changes in the United States coincided with a population boom in Mexico and Central America that resulted in a near tripling of the region's population. Economic growth was unable to keep pace with demographic change, however, and many of the region's youth sought opportunities in the United States.

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