Migration Publications

Today We March, Tomorrow We Vote: Latino Migrant Civic Engagement in L.A.

Jul 07, 2011
This report is part of a series on Latin American immigrant civic and political participation that looks at eight cities around the United States: Charlotte, NC; Chicago, IL; Fresno, CA; Las Vegas, NV; Los Angeles, CA; Omaha, NE; Tucson, AZ; and Washington, DC. The reports on each city describe the opportunities and barriers that Latino immigrants face in participating as civic and political actors in cities around the United States.

Too Poor for Peace? Global Poverty, Conflict, and Security in the 21st Century

Jul 07, 2011
The book’s broad thesis is that alleviating poverty in the 21st century is not only a moral but also a security imperative.

ECSP Report 8: Bibliography

Jul 07, 2011
Literature that has come to the attention of ECSP in the past year on population, environmental change, and security issues.

ECSP Report 3: Event Summaries, Update, and Bibliography

Jul 07, 2011
Event summaries from nine of the 1996 sessions, as well as highlights of the environment, population, and security activities of foundations, nongovernmental organizations, academic programs, and government offices, a list of Internet sites and resources, and a bibliographic guide to the literature.

The Russian Minority in Central Asia: Migration, Politics, and Language (2008)

Jul 07, 2011
Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Kennan Institute Occasional Paper Series #297, 2008. PDF 28 pages.

238. Nationalism and the Problem of Inclusion in Hungary

Jul 07, 2011
October 2001- Budapest was the fastest growing European city in the 19th century and about a quarter of its population was Jewish. Jews in Eastern Europe have functioned like the canary in the mine: what happened to the canary would soon enough happen to the miners. The degree Hungarian Jews felt included, excluded, then ambivalent and confused about leaving or staying also provides a glimpse of the history of Hungarian nationalism in its various manifestations between 1848 and the present.

Evolving Demographic and Human-Capital Trends in Mexico and Central America and Their Implications For Regional Migration

May 01, 2011
As the US labor force became better educated, fewer native workers accepted many of the low-wage but essential jobs at the bottom of the labor market. These changes in the United States coincided with a population boom in Mexico and Central America that resulted in a near tripling of the region's population. Economic growth was unable to keep pace with demographic change, however, and many of the region's youth sought opportunities in the United States.

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