Nuclear Weapons Publications

Arms Control in Cyberspace?

Nov 02, 2015
U.S. policymakers have compared the challenge of managing threats in the cyber domain to that of controlling nuclear weapons during the Cold War. The United States and China are currently negotiating what would be the first cyber arms control agreement to ban attacks on each other’s critical infrastructure in peacetime. The Obama administration believes such an agreement could lead to a broader “international framework” of norms, treaties, and institutions to govern cyberspace. Arms control and deterrence are longstanding U.S. policy instruments that are being revived and retooled to meet contemporary cyber challenges. But the utility of these Cold War strategies, which constitute necessary but not sufficient measures, will be inherently limited owing to fundamental differences between the nuclear and cyber domains.

The Inter-Church Peace Council and the Nuclear Arms Race

Sep 14, 2015
Ruud van Dijk and Joppe Shaaper explore the political factors and ideological influences that shaped the origins of the Inter-Church Peace Council (IKV) and its campaign against the Nuclear Arms Race. The origins of the IKV campaign inform our understanding of the wider debate over nuclear weapons in the 1970s, détente and the Cold War, and the shift in thinking about the importance of nuclear weapons in international politics.

Iran’s Nuclear Chess: After the Deal

Sep 08, 2015
"Iran's Nuclear Chess: After the Deal," the updated edition of the monograph "Iran's Nuclear Chess: Calculating America's Moves," by Robert Litwak, vice president for scholars and director of international security studies at the Wilson Center, addresses the nuclear agreement between the P5+1 and Iran and assesses its terms and prospective implementation, as well as the implications should the agreement not be implemented.

Prelude to the Euromissile Crisis

Aug 03, 2015
Ruud van Dijk explores the extent to which the Dutch government influenced NATO's decision not to deploy enhanced radiation weapons (ERW) in Western Europe, and how that decision might have avoided further escalation and tensions in the cold war.

The Origins of Nuclear Cooperation

Jul 20, 2015
The Origins of Nuclear Cooperation: A Critical Oral History Between Brazil and Argentina tells a unique and rich story about how two regional nuclear rivals de-escalated their nuclear rivalry in ways that promoted regional and international security.

Tlatelolco Tested

Jul 06, 2015
Ryan Musto explores the unprecedented role played by OPANAL, the control agency for the Latin American Nuclear Weapons Free Zone, in addressing the first accusations of a militaristic violation of a NWFZ in history during the Falklands/Malvinas War.

The Imagined Arsenal

Jun 18, 2015
Yogesh Joshi explores how new archival evidence from the Nehru Memorial Museum and Library on the 1974 PNE and the origins of India's nuclear submarine program can inform strategic discourse on India's nuclear weapons program.

Can a Nuclear Deal Help Iran’s Young Labor Force?

Jun 04, 2015
Iran is poised to reap a vast “demographic dividend” if the appropriate national and international policies are adopted, including a nuclear deal with the P5+1. It is about time for Iran to capitalize on its human capital by allowing its young and educated labor force to compete in the global market. Countries generally have only one chance to reap the demographic dividend as they go through the demographic transition. Iran cannot afford to miss it.

The Persistent Legacy: Germany's Place in the Nuclear Order

May 19, 2015
Despite its legal status, Germany has never been an ordinary non-nuclear weapons state. In "The Persistent Legacy: Germany's Place in the Nuclear Order," Andreas Lutsch explores the historical dimensions of Germany's ambiguous position in the global nuclear order and re-examines Germany's efforts to revise its NATO role as a host for US nuclear weapons.

The US Discovery of Israel's Secret Nuclear Project

Apr 15, 2015
Israeli Cover Stories about the Dimona Reactor Dismayed Top Level Officials Who Saw a "Clearly Apparent Lack of Candor"