Southeast Europe Publications

Macedonia, F.Y.R.

Jul 07, 2011

Challenges in Southeastern Europe

Jul 07, 2011
April 2001- The following is excerpted from a keynote address delivered by Mr. Swigert at a conference, "Greece in Southeastern Europe: Security, Commerce, and Geopolitics," organized by the Western Policy Center.

The Case For Ending Greece's Ban on Private Universities

Jul 07, 2011
September 2003 - For over a century, American colleges and universities, many originating in the 19th century as Protestant seminaries, have operated on a private, non-profit basis in the Mediterranean region. Today, they form the nucleus of the American Association of International Colleges and Universities (AAICU) and have, over the years, added an important dimension to relations between host countries and the United States.

Pax Europeaa: EU Challenges and Prospects in Eurasia, Africa and the Middle East

Jul 07, 2011
June 2008- The EU has fundamentally defined relations with its neighbors through its enlargement policy. At present, further enlargement, beyond the countries designated as candidate or potential candidate Member States, appears unlikely in the short term. Numerous conditions have been pointed out as necessary circumstances prior to any further widening of the Union.

Montenegro: The Next Balkan Challenge, By Srdjan Darmanovic Center for Democracy and Human Rights Special to the Western Policy Center

Jul 07, 2011
Nov./Dec. 2000 - The ouster of Milosevic and the disappearance of the Serbian military threat to Montenegro were greeted with relief in the republic. They signaled the end of the three-year "black and white" struggle in which the democratically elected government of Montenegro, with substantial help from its Western supporters in the U.S. and the EU, had fought for survival against a dictatorship that caused four wars in the region. Since the electoral defeat of Milosevic, the international position of Montenegro and its internal political priorities have changed drastically.

Turkey: Europe Our Friend, America Our Partner

Jul 07, 2011
December 2002 - Disappointed, Turkish leaders left the December 12-13 European Union summit in Copenhagen without a firm date for accession talks, but they promised to forge ahead with the country's European orientation. Turkey's new government, led by former Islamists, has indicated its willingness to meet Europe's membership criteria by delivering further political reforms and a solution to the Cyprus issue. It is expected to continue to push for progress on both fronts until the EU's December 2004 review of Turkey's eligibility for accession talks. The country may, in fact, begin talks soon afterwards.

Turkey's Western Destiny

Jul 07, 2011
April 24, 2007- (Published in the Wall Street Journal, Page A19) By midnight tomorrow, Prime Minister Recep Tayip Erdogan will decide the ruling Justice and Development Party's (AKP) candidate for president of Turkey. Ten days ago, in an unprecedented gathering demonstrating the polarization gripping that country, hundreds of thousands marched in Ankara against Mr. Erdogan choosing himself.

Cyprus and the Military Component of Diplomacy

Jul 07, 2011
May/June 2000 - In his inaugural address in 1969, five years before the division of Cyprus, President Nixon said, "The greatest honor history can bestow is the title of peacemaker." He was referring then to America's role in the world. Today, that promise of greatness and the title of peacemaker are within reach of Greece and Turkey should they find a settlement to the Cyprus problem.

Regime Change in Iraq: Repercussions for Turkey

Jul 07, 2011
June/July 2002 - For many experts on the U.S.-Turkish relationship, the "acid test" concerning this relationship is likely to come with the long-awaited American military campaign in Iraq aimed at ousting Saddam Hussein's regime.

Last Tango in Cyprus: The Negotiating Challenges Ahead

Jul 07, 2011
Jan./Feb. 2002 - So finally we have it: the last tango in Cyprus, where the clock is ticking louder than it has since the division of the island in 1974. The men who will dance to the tune—Cyprus President Glafcos Clerides and Turkish Cypriot leader Rauf Denktash—are not bit players in this fractured corner of the Levant, but political hegemons who have dominated its messy history for the past 40 years.

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