Soviet Union Publications

Bulletin No. 6/7 -- Winter 1995

Jul 13, 2011
The Cold War in Asia

Bulletin No. 8/9 -- Winter 1996

Jul 13, 2011
The Cold War in the Third World and the Collapse of Detente in the 1970s

Bulletin No. 10 -- March 1998

Jul 13, 2011
Leadership Transition in a Fractured Bloc

Bulletin No. 11 -- Winter 1998

Jul 13, 2011
Cold War Flashpoints

Bulletin No. 12/13 -- Fall/Winter 2001

Jul 13, 2011
The End of the Cold War

Bulletin No. 14/15 -- Winter 2003-Spring 2004

Jul 13, 2011
New Evidence on North Korea

Secrecy vs. the Need for Ecological Information: Challenges to Environmental Activism in Russia

Jul 07, 2011
This article will explore how an individual environmental organization ventured through the minefields of international security and diplomacy, forging obvious as well as unlikely alliances along the way.

189. Europe and U.S. Relations 10 Years After the Fall of the Berlin Wall: A Retrospective

Jul 07, 2011
November 1999 - A decade later, the events of 1989 have lost none of their capacity to astonish. The sheer possibilities open at that time are enough to baffle even the knowledgeable observer. For those of us who lived through these events as they happened and had a certain role in shaping them, the enormity of what transpired that fateful year becomes even more amazing with the passage of time.

10. The Dynamics of Dependency

Jul 07, 2011
This paper analyzes the dynamics of dependency in Eastern Europe in the broader context of the ontology of socialism. The East European states' dependence on the Soviet Union since World War II, varying as it has in both content and form over time and from country to country, is so closely connected to the genesis of socialism in Eastern Europe that it should be regarded as an essential element in the ontoloqy of socialism in this region.

274. One Hypothesis on the Different Outcomes of Soviet and Yugoslav State Collapse

Jul 07, 2011
In 1991, the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia—two multinational Communist federal states with comparable histories of indigenous revolutions and similar nationality policies—disintegrated. As the only two countries that fully implemented the system of ethno-territorial federalism, the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia shared important structural features. In both cases, the basic political-administrative units—the republics—were organized along ethnic lines and were seen as the quasi-national homelands of the titular nations.

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