Trade and Development Publications

Subsidizing Inequality: Mexican Corn Policy Since NAFTA

Sep 11, 2011
This study on Mexican corn policy since NAFTA was made possible thanks to a grant from the Global Development Program of the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and reflects collaboration between the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars’ Mexico Institute, the University of California, Santa Cruz and researchers from CIDE, the Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas.

The Cuban Economy: Recent Trends

Aug 01, 2011
This publication examines the contemporary state of Cuba’s economy at a time of great transformation through the use of econometric and other macroeconomic analysis tools.

Certification: The Path to Conflict-Free Minerals from Congo

Jul 21, 2011
The conflict minerals movement is gaining traction. The movement is a pragmatic effort to address one of the principal drivers of atrocities and conflict throughout Congo’s tortured history: the scramble for control of Congo's vast mineral resources. In eastern Congo today, these mineral resources are financing multiple armed groups, many of whom use mass rape as a deliberate strategy to intimidate and control local populations. Armed groups and military units earn hundreds of millions of dollars per year by trading four main minerals: the ores that produce tin, tantalum, tungsten, and gold. This money enables the militias to self-finance their campaign of brutal violence against civilians, with some of the worst abuses occurring in mining areas.

Trade & Economic Development

Jul 14, 2011
This paper is intended to promote discussion as to the role that trade can play in speeding development in Africa and the possible steps that can be taken to enable Africa to participate more fully in the global market. It does not cover all the barriers to expanding trade by African countries. Other important topics – notably infrastructure, especially ports and roads, and corruption – are discussed in other conference papers. It also does not include issues that are not directly related to trade and which can only be dealt with in the longer term, such as improved health and education, which were critical components of the success of the Asian “tigers”.

Issue 22: Coffee and Community: Combining Agribusiness and Health in Rwanda

Jul 12, 2011
Author Irene Kitzantides describes the SPREAD Project's integration of agribusiness development with community health care and education, including family planning, in Rwanda.

Looking Forward: U.S.-Japan Economic Partnership in the Post-Lehman World

Jul 12, 2011
A report on a December 2010 conference in Tokyo organized by the Asia Program and the Sasakawa Peace Foundation (SPF) convening experts from Japan and the United States to discuss the implications of the 2008 global financial crisis.

An American Open Door? Maximizing the Benefits of Chinese Foreign Direct Investment

Jul 11, 2011
This project was undertaken by Asia Society’s Center on U.S.-China Relations, the Kissinger Institute on China and the United States at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and the Monitor Group.
Central America Trip Report

Security and Trade in Central America

Jul 07, 2011
The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars sponsored a congressional study trip to El Salvador and Guatemala from April 13 through April 18, 2009. It was organized by the Wilson Center on the Hill Program and the Latin American Program at the Wilson Center. The trip focused on two issues that are critical for the United States’ relationships with countries across Central America – security and economic development.

China and the WTO: Domestic Challenges and International Pressures

Jul 07, 2011
Report on a December 11, 2001 Wilson Center Conference focused on three major challenges posed by China’s membership in the WTO: adjust in the rural sector; the impact on China’s state run enterprises; and the myriad adjustments China will make as it meets its WTO obligations.

The WTO and MEAs: Time for a Good Neighbor Policy

Jul 07, 2011
The WTO and MEAs are neighbors in the world legal community, and need to better define their relationship so that they can operate in mutual support and harmony, writes William Krist in this policy brief.

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