West Africa Publications

Democracy and Peace-building: Re-thinking the Conventional Wisdom

Jul 07, 2011
Author Posting. (c) 'The Round Table Ltd', 2008.This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of 'The Round Table Ltd' for personal use, not for redistribution.The definitive version was published in The Round Table, Volume 97 Issue 394, February 2008.doi:10.1080/00358530701844742 (http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00358530701844742)

Is EITI Another Western Agenda?

Jul 07, 2011
Experience has increasingly shown that the abundance of natural resources does not necessarily produce rapid development in countries where they are found. Instead, paradoxically, they all too often produce poverty, conflict and corruption whose consequences become increasingly widespread and impact development, not only in the country in question, but more broadly in an interconnected world. The rapidly globalizing world means that these consequences transcend boundaries and threaten stability of both the developed and developing world. It is therefore common sense that a search for the reversal of this disturbing trend becomes a global collective.
A Distant Front in the Cold War: The USSR in West Africa and the Congo, 1956-1964 by Sergey Mazov

A Distant Front in the Cold War: The USSR in West Africa and the Congo, 1956–1964

Oct 01, 2010
A Distant Front in the Cold War reveals West Africa as a significant site of Cold War conflict in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Although the region avoided the extreme tensions of the standoff in Eastern Europe or in the Cuban missile crisis, it nevertheless offers a vivid example of political, economic, and propagandistic rivalry between the US and the USSR.
Rethinking the Economics of War: The Intersection of Need, Creed, and Greed, edited by Cynthia J. Arnson and I. William Zartman

Rethinking the Economics of War: The Intersection of Need, Creed, and Greed

Oct 01, 2005
Rethinking the Economics of War questions the adequacy of explaining today’s internal armed conflicts purely in terms of economic factors and reestablishes the importance of identity and grievances in creating and sustaining such wars.

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