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Armenia

The Next Crisis You're Not Watching: Don't Ignore the South Caucasus

Paris and Syria share the headlines today, but worrying developments in the South Caucasus raise alarm bells about weak governance and the risk of war. The countries of the region—Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia—have chosen diverging domestic and foreign policy paths, but all face intense pressures from Russia to expand its influence. The West should act now to diminish the likelihood of a new war and press for greater political pluralism.

Eliminating an Existential Threat: the Armenian Genocide, 1915-1916

Interview with Ronald Suny, Kennan Institute Title VIII Short-term Scholar, and Professor of History, University of Michigan, on August 11, 2014. Kennan Institute Project "The Armenian Genocide, 1915-1916."

Malinkin: Can you talk a bit about why the Turkish government perceived the Armenians and Assyrians as a threat, and why they chose such an extreme approach to handle them?

"They Can Live in the Desert but Nowhere Else: A History of the Armenian Genocide"

Starting in early 1915, the Ottoman Turks began deporting and killing hundreds of thousands of Armenians in the first major genocide of the twentieth century. By the end of the First World War, the number of Armenians in what would become Turkey had been reduced by ninety percent—more than a million people. A century later, the Armenian Genocide remains controversial but relatively unknown, overshadowed by later slaughters and the chasm separating Turkish and Armenian versions of events.

Putting the South Caucasus in Perspective

Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia have been independent states for more than 23 years. Although geographically contiguous, they differ in language, religion, and political and security orientation. How is each country faring in state-building, developing democracy, and improving economic performance? What are their relationships with Russia and the West, and with each other? How does their historical experience influence current developments, and what are their long term prospects?

The Impact of Ukraine in the Neighborhood

Russia's annexation of Crimea and support of separatists in eastern Ukraine is having ripple effects throughout Eurasia.  But what has been the impact in the immediate neighborhood, the South Caucasus, Moldova, and Belarus as well as Ukraine itself? This distinguished panel will examine recent developments and prospects in each focusing first on the situation on the ground in Ukraine, the performance of the Poroshenko government, and the latest Russian moves. Georgia and Moldova, as well as Ukraine have now signed their partnership agreements with the EU; how has Russia reacted?

Women in Conflict Resolution: Top-Down vs. Bottom-Up Approaches

The inclusion of women in foreign policy-making and implementation in peace-building and post-conflict transformation is known to result in better policies for all. Yet, women remain under-represented in the field. Attempts to involve women have largely focused on top-down approaches. However, bottom-up approaches demonstrate a lot of potential, as shown by the involvement of women in Turkish-Greek and Turkish-Armenian conflict resolution processes. In which way are bottom-up approaches effective? What can we learn from previous efforts? Which lessons are applicable internationally? 

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