Central Africa | Wilson Center

Central Africa

Sustained Development, Democracy, and Peace in Africa

When the Norwegian Nobel Committee honored me with the Nobel Peace Prize in 2004, it intended to send a new and historic message to the world: to rethink peace and security. It wanted to challenge the world to discover the close linkage between good governance, sustainable management of resources, and peace. In managing our resources, we need to realize that they are limited and need to be managed more sustainably, responsibly, and accountably.

Minerals, Forests, and Violent Conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is emerging from a bloody war that has claimed the lives of nearly 4 million people, the majority of them in the eastern part of the country. In the absence of a strong state, the raging civil wars allowed the rebels, neighboring countries (Burundi, Rwanda, and Uganda), and international players to plunder the country’s unparalleled endowment of valuable minerals, wildlife, and timber.

Conflict and Cooperation: Making the Case for Environmental Pathways to Peacebuilding in the Great Lakes Region

Opportunities for environmental peacemaking in the Great Lakes Region have not yet been isolated, even though there are many examples of cooperation at the national, regional, subregional, and local levels. With its prevalence of conflict and transboundary ecosystems, the Great Lakes Region could be a potential model for a future worldwide initiative in environmental peacemaking.

Water, Conflict, and Cooperation: Lessons From the Nile River Basin (No. 4)

In 1979, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat said: “The only matter that could take Egypt to war again is water.” In 1988 then-Egyptian Foreign Minister Boutros Boutros-Ghali, who later became the United Nations’ Secretary-General, predicted that the next war in the Middle East would be fought over the waters of the Nile, not politics. Rather than accept these frightening predictions, we must examine them within the context of the Nile River basin and the relationships forged among the states that share its waters.

Eau, conflits et cooperation: Lecons tirees de l'experience du bassin fluvial du Nil (No. 4)

En 1979, le président égyptien Anouar el-Sadate déclarait : « Le seul mobile qui pourrait conduire l’Égypte à entrer de nouveau en guerre est l’eau ». En 1988, Boutros Boutros-Ghali, alors ministre égyptien des affaires étrangères et devenu plus tard Secrétaire général des Nations Unies, prédisait que la prochaine guerre au Moyen-Orient serait à propos des eaux du Nil et non à propos de politiques. Au lieu d’accepter ces prédictions alarmantes, nous devons les examiner dans le contexte du bassin fluvial du Nil et des relations établies entre les états qui partagent ces eaux.

PECS News Issue 2 (Spring 2000)

PECS News Issue 2 includes:

Oiling the Friction: Environmental Conflict Management in the Niger Delta, Nigeria (Event Summary)

Environmental Cooperation for Regional Peace and Security in Southern Africa (Event Summary)

Forest Futures: Population, Consumption, and Wood Resources (Event Summary)

Progress in Gender Integration at the World Wildlife Fund Nepal Program - Melissa Thaxton

Violence Through Environmental Discrimination: Causes, Rwanda Arena, and Conflict Model (Book Review)

Conflict and Cooperation: Making the Case for Environmental Pathways to Peacebuilding in the Great Lakes Region

Opportunities for environmental peacemaking in the Great Lakes Region have not yet been isolated, even though there are many examples of cooperation at the national, regional, sub-regional, and local levels. This brief examines the possibility of using environmental management as a pathway to peace in the region. With its prevalence of conflict and transboundary ecosystems, the Great Lakes Region could be a potential model for a future worldwide initiative in environmental peacemaking.

Conflict and Cooperation: Making the Case for Environmental Pathways to Peacebuilding in the Great Lakes Region

Authoritarian regimes, genocides, and civil wars have plagued countries in the Great Lakes Region in recent years. The region’s nations rely heavily on natural resources—water, minerals, land—for their economic development, as well as for the livelihoods of their people, and many of the region’s conflicts are connected to these resources or other environmental factors.

Global Drug Trafficking: Africa's Expanding Role

Africa's role in the drug trafficking industry is a strong testament to the interplay of supply and demand market expansion, to the hybridization of transnational organized crime syndicates, as well as to the need for a paradigm shift in domestic, regional and international approaches to drug trafficking interdiction. On May 28, 2009, the Africa Program of the Woodrow Wilson Center convened a conference to assess the situation of international drug trafficking and the increasingly important role that Africa plays.

It Always Rains in the Same Place First: Geographic Favoritism in Rural Burundi

On June 2, 2005, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Center for Strategic and International Studies hosted a conference entitled,“Uganda:An African ‘Success’ Past its Prime?” Before a full auditorium, Dr. Joel Barkan and Ambassador Johnnie Carson discussed recent political developments in Uganda, and the implications of these developments for long-term Ugandan democratization and stability.

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