Central Africa | Wilson Center

Central Africa

Director's Forum with Bill Clinton

President Clinton focused his talk on his recent two-week trip to Africa, during which he visited five nations: Mozambique, Rwanda, Ghana, Nigeria, and South Africa. Given his stated interest in economically empowering poor communities around the world, Clinton visited Africa to continue his work to promote HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention, democratization, and economic development. Other areas he has actively pursued since leaving office that were among the themes promoted on his Africa trip included racial and ethnic reconciliation; citizen participation; and education.

Captive in the Congo: A Consul's Return to the Heart of Darkness

Summary of a meeting with Michael P. Hoyt, Former Consul in the Congo.

Certification: The Path to Conflict-Free Minerals from Congo

The Woodrow Wilson Center's Africa Program in co-sponsorship with the Enough Project assembled a panel of experts from American, British and Congolese governments, private industry, and the non-governmental community to discuss the deplorable situation in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo involving conflict minerals and the way forward.

Bolstering Global Food Security

Dramatic events over the last year have shed light on the problem of global food security: massive fires in Russia, which reduced wheat supplies; famine and drought in Niger and Chad; and food price riots in the Middle East and elsewhere. These stresses come amid price spikes that echo the food crises of 2008 and reveal the linked nature of food security today.

Enterprising Women in Urban Zimbabwe: Gender, Microbusiness, and Globalization

Based on a series of interviews conducted throughout the 1990s, Enterprising Women in Urban Zimbabwe discusses the business and personal experiences of women entrepreneurs in the cities of Harare and Bulawayo, who worked in the market trade, crocheting, sewing, and hairdressing professions of the microenterprise sector.

Rethinking the Economics of War: The Intersection of Need, Creed, and Greed

Rethinking the Economics of War: The Intersection of Need, Creed, and Greed questions the adequacy of explaining today’s internal armed conflicts purely in terms of economic factors and reestablishes the importance of identity and grievances in creating and sustaining such wars. This collection of essays responds to current works asserting that the income from natural resources is the end and not just a means for warring rebel groups. The study puts greed in its place and restores the importance of deprivation and discrimination as the primary causes of armed conflict within states.

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