China Mainland

A 'World Class' Military: Assessing China's Global Military Ambitions

How Past Wars Shape the Present in China, Russia, and North Korea

In this edition of Wilson Center NOW we speak with Wilson Fellow Katie Stallard-Blanchette about her project “Dancing on Bones,” a book-length investigation of how China, Russia, and North Korea exploit their wartime past to secure contemporary regime legitimacy, and justify aggressive foreign policy. 

Guest

Flash Analysis: Chinese President Xi Jinping's Visit to North Korea

On June 20th, Chinese President Xi Jinping is scheduled to make a two day state visit to North Korea.  While Kim Jong Un has traveled to China several times over the last year, this will be Xi's first trip to Pyongyang.  Three Wilson Center experts offer their analysis of the implications and potential outcomes.

 

Jean H. Lee, director of the Hyundai Motor-Korea Foundation Center for Korean History and Public Policy:

China’s Presence in Latin America

How quickly are China’s economic and diplomatic relationships in Latin America growing? And does China’s growing regional profile have negative implications for the US? In this edition of Wilson Center NOW we asked two Wilson expert analysts, Benjamin Creutzfeldt and Jorge Heine, to put China’s presence in Latin American in perspective.

Guests

Values and U.S. Policy Toward the Indo-Pacific

In recent weeks, the Trump administration has sought to address the role that values and norms should play in its foreign policy generally, and in the U.S. strategy toward the Indo-Pacific specifically. This is a reflection of a long-standing debate in American foreign policy, going back to the founding of the nation itself, but the arguments made by top U.S. officials are worth considering.

China's New Red Guards: The Return of Radicalism and the Rebirth of Mao Zedong

It wasn’t only foreign observers who thought Mao Zedong’s radicalism ended with his death in 1976; throughout the Deng, Jiang, and Hu eras, most Chinese intellectuals and Party members believed that Mao, while far from reviled, belonged to a stage of China’s development that would not be revisited. In his new book, Jude Blanchette traces the reemergence of radical leftism among educated Chinese. What does the embrace of nationalism, authoritarianism, and Maoist nostalgia by young intellectuals portend as China’s power grows?

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