Egypt | Wilson Center

Egypt

Egypt’s Coups and Revolutions: From Mubarak to Sisi

In this edition of Wilson Center NOW we speak with Wilson Center Middle East Fellow and author Amy Austin Holmes about the release of her new book, Coups and Revolutions: Mass Mobilization, the Egyptian Military, and the United States from Mubarak to Sisi. The book analyzes the waves of revolution and counterrevolution in Egypt between 2011 and 2018 and  brings together the literature on bottom-up revolution

Book Launch | Coups and Revolutions: Mass Mobilization, the Egyptian Military, and the United States from Mubarak to Sisi

"Coups and Revolutions masterfully analyzes the waves of revolution and counterrevolution in Egypt between 2011 and 2018. Holmes' analysis rests upon both a close familiarity with events in Egypt and a nuanced deployment of social-scientific theories of coups and revolutions. Her novel concept of 'coup from below' will surely generate much discussion and debate. Read this book to understand why and how a promising revolution was ruthlessly crushed."

---- Jeff Goodwin, Professor of Sociology at New York University

Coups and Revolutions: Mass Mobilization, the Egyptian Military, and the United States from Mubarak to Sisi

In 2011, Egypt witnessed more protests than any other country in the world. Counter to the received narrative, Amy Austin Holmes argues that the ousting of Mubarak in 2011 did not represent the culmination of a revolution or the beginning of a transition period, but rather the beginning of a revolutionary process that would unfold in three waves, followed by two waves of counterrevolution. This book offers the first analysis of both the revolution and counterrevolution in Egypt from January 2011 until June 2018.

Strengthening Egypt’s Refugee Programs

Over the past two years the number of registered refugees and asylum seekers in Egypt has increased by 21 percent. Today, Egypt is among the highest destination countries in Africa receiving documented and undocumented immigrants. Many are African, Yemeni, or Syrian refugees fleeing political instability, conflict, and civil war.

Muslim Brotherhood: Friend or Foe?

In this edition of Wilson Center NOW we discuss the Trump administration’s effort to designate the Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist organization and pursue possible sanctions against the Islamist political movement.  Wilson Center Fellow Amy Austin Holmes explains how this decision might not meet the legal criteria for this terrorist designation and could open up a new conflict between the US government and Muslims throughout the region.

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Operating from the Margins: Women’s Rights Organizations in Egypt

On March 8, 2019, Egypt as well as the rest of the world celebrate International Women’s Day. Usually, on that day, like many cities around the world, Egyptian women and activists across the political spectrum unite and demonstrate issues pertaining to women and minorities. In Egypt, however, this symbolic celebration is muffled for the fifth year in a row as a result of the crackdown on the Egyptian civil society that was further enhanced after passing the restrictive NGO Law no. 70 of 2017.

Egyptian Women: The Gap Between the Haves and the Have Nots

It’s hard to talk about the status of Egyptian women in any sector without addressing the gap between the haves and the have nots. While some women continue to make headlines, others are stuck in the doldrums of living below the poverty line. Although female literacy rates have increased from 22.4% in 1976 to 68% in 2015, illiteracy remains an impediment towards equal human rights.

Global Fellow David D. Kirkpatrick's Book Selected One of the Economist's Books of the Year

Global Fellow David D. Kirkpatrick's book Into the Hands of the Soldiers: Freedom and Chaos in Egypt and the Middle East was featured on The Economist's books of the year list in the December 1st issue. The book was listed as number five in the "Politics and current affairs" category.

Statement on the Sentencing of Ismail Alexandrani

The Wilson Center is deeply concerned by the process leading to what appears to be an egregious 10-year prison sentence that an Egyptian military court imposed on Ismail Alexandrani, an Egyptian researcher, investigative journalist, and former Wilson Center Fellow.

We have been in touch with the State Department, which has been closely following Alexandrani’s case since his arrest in 2015. The U.S. Embassy in Cairo has raised it several times with the Egyptian government in the context of human rights concerns.

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