Georgia

The Unfinished Business of the 1989 East European Revolutions

Recent developments in Ukraine can be viewed as a third attempt to complete the unfinished business of the 1989 East European revolutions. These revolutions succeeded in Central Europe and the Baltics, but brought mixed results in the Balkans and the former Soviet Republics. Ukraine, Moldova, and Georgia remain the only post-Soviet states defying authoritarian tendencies. Dr. Riabchuk examined what could be done to complete the unfinished business of 1989 and strengthen democratic institutions in these former Soviet states.

Stand Up for Georgia

With a new prime minister in former foreign and economics minister Giorgi Kvirikashvili, Georgia has an opportunity to reinvigorate its democracy and economy. But two main challenges lie ahead for him: organizing free and fair parliamentary elections next October while reviving the fortunes of his Georgian Dream coalition, and stimulating the economy and foreign investment. Wedged in a troubled region, Georgia stands out as an emerging democracy. Although Middle East and Russia-Ukraine crises loom large, Western leaders cannot forget Georgia.

The Next Crisis You're Not Watching: Don't Ignore the South Caucasus

Paris and Syria share the headlines today, but worrying developments in the South Caucasus raise alarm bells about weak governance and the risk of war. The countries of the region—Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia—have chosen diverging domestic and foreign policy paths, but all face intense pressures from Russia to expand its influence. The West should act now to diminish the likelihood of a new war and press for greater political pluralism.

Georgia: Between East and West

While many of its neighbors have struggled, Georgia’s democracy continues to develop and its role regionally and internationally continues to grow as well. A geographical gateway between East and West, the nation sits in the center of a dynamic and rapidly changing region. Georgia President Giorgi Margvelashvili visited the Wilson Center to discuss a host of important issues with the Center’s Director, former Congresswoman Jane Harman. 

A Conversation with the President of Georgia Giorgi Margvelashvili

Georgia is Europe's gateway between the East and the West. It lies at the heart of a region rapidly changing—Russia, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia. An aspirant to EU and NATO, Georgia’s soldiers have fought in Iraq and Afghanistan as America’s allies. Its democracy has developed against the odds in a neighborhood where power is often exercised without popular consent. How will the strategic realignments underway in Eurasia affect Georgia? Is Georgia’s embrace of the West enduring, and what path links Georgia’s future to Europe and America?

Georgia’s Foreign Policy Priorities

The Caucasus has experienced its own aftershocks from the Ukrainian crisis, especially in Georgia, which recently witnessed major turnover in the key foreign policy positions. The Georgian government appears increasingly divided as the Georgian Dream coalition faces several major domestic and international challenges. Mr. Zviad Dzidziguri, Deputy Chairman of the Parliament of Georgia, addressed the country’s foreign policy priorities in the region, with NATO, and with the European Union.

 

Rough and Tumble of Building Democracy in Georgia

Leadership squabbles and instincts for retribution are testing Georgia’s democracy. If leaders do not come together to strengthen the political system and governance, Georgia’s future could hang in the balance.

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