Germany | Wilson Center

Germany

Germany 30 Years After the Fall of the Berlin Wall

In this edition of Wilson Center NOW we speak with author Hope M. Harrison about her new book, After the Berlin Wall: Memory and the Making of the New Germany, 1989 to the Present. Drawing on an extensive range of archival sources and interviews, the book profiles German citizens who have fought to commemorate the history of the Berlin Wall and examines their roles in the creation of a new German national narrative for the 21st Century.
 
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After the Berlin Wall: Memory and the Making of the New Germany, 1989 to the Present

The history and meaning of the Berlin Wall remain controversial, even three decades after its fall. Drawing on an extensive range of archival sources and interviews, this book profiles key memory activists who have fought to commemorate the history of the Berlin Wall and examines their role in the creation of a new German national narrative. With victims, perpetrators and heroes, the Berlin Wall has joined the Holocaust as an essential part of German collective memory.

After the Berlin Wall: Memory and the Making of the New Germany, 1989 to the Present

Thirty years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, its history, meaning and legacy remain contentious, even as the Berlin Wall has joined the Holocaust as a focus of German memory policy. Dr. Harrison's new book examines a multiplicity of methods the Germans have adopted for grappling with the history of the Berlin Wall. It also highlights the role of key German memory activists as well as a more diffuse global memory of the Wall in the formulation of German historical narratives about the Wall. Dr.

West Germany and Israel: Foreign Relations, Domestic Politics, and the Cold War, 1965-1974

Bringing new evidence and analysis to the changes in a fraught historical relationship, Carole Fink will discuss how West Germany and Israel moved in almost opposite directions after 1965: The FRG, the world’s third largest export economy, launched a series of independent diplomatic initiatives in Europe and the Middle East, while Israel, after its 1967 military victory, became increasingly isolated and dependent upon the United States. Yet the two countries remained closely connected by shared security concerns, personal bonds, and the recurrent evocations of the German-Jewish past.

Hans Kammler, Hitler’s Last Hope, in American Hands

To download this Working Paper, please click here.

Frank Döbert and Rainer Karlsch

CWIHP Working Paper #91

Hans Kammler, Hitler’s Last Hope, in American Hands

Frank Döbert and Rainer Karlsch
August 2019

 

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