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Why Promoting Tolerance and Inclusion in Europe is in the U.S. Interest

“Why Promoting Tolerance and Inclusion in Europe is in the U.S. Interest,” a Wilson Center policy brief by former Public Policy Scholar Spencer P. Boyer, demonstrates the relevance of diversity politics in Europe and its importance to the transatlantic relationship.  The evolving debate across Europe about how to manage growing diversity effectively is often met with a backlash against the notion that Europe should openly embrace these demographic changes.

Current Immigration and Integration Debates in Germany and the United States: What We Can Learn from Each Other

Former Public Policy Scholar Spencer P. Boyer compares immigration and integration debates in Germany and the United States in a policy paper co-authored with Victoria Pardini.

Brazil-South Africa Nuclear Relations

This dossier deals with a little known episode in the history of Brazil’s nuclear program: South Africa’s attempt to cooperate with Brazil.

The Woodrow Wilson Center Announces 2013 – 2014 Fellowship Class

WASHINGTON—Jane Harman, director, president & CEO of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, announced the members of the 2013-2014 fellowship class. The 21 fellows, most of whom are expected to start September 2013 to spend an academic year in residence at the Center, include scholars and practitioners from the United States, Germany, Hungary, Israel, Japan, Kyrgyzstan, the Netherlands, and New Zealand.

German Unification Twenty-Five Years Later

After the first quarter century of development since the overthrow of Communism and the reunification of East and West Germany, how does one draw up a balance sheet?  How can one assess the transfer of political institutions, the economic crises, the difficulties of women’s adjustment?  There were substantial successes but also significant failures. Many of the international moves of the Berlin Republic can only be understood by considering the difficult process of adjustment during and after unification. 

Russia's Energy Bully Takes a Fall

"After years as Eurasia's energy bully, Russia's state-controlled natural gas monopoly, Gazprom, is getting a taste of its own medicine," stated Alexandros Petersen in an article published by Foreign Policy earlier this week. According to Petersen, the shift in demand for natural gas throughout Europe, combined with persistent low prices, has caused the Russian giant to reconsider its marketing and pricing strategies.

Media Briefing: Secretary Kerry's First Interntational Trip

On February 24 John Kerry will make his first international trip as Secretary of State, including stops in the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Italy, Turkey, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, and Qatar. What will be the economic and political impacts globally of the announced trade alliance between the U.S. and Europe? Do recent military interventions in Libya and Mali provide models for the future of transatlantic alliances like NATO? How will the U.S. and Europe address continuing instability in the MENA region following the Arab Awakening?

1989 After 1989: Memory in Transition in Central and Eastern Europe

The eastern European revolutions of 1989 were a watershed in global history. Despite this, in the two decades since, their meaning has become a source of debate. While they have been promoted as a founding myth for a newly unified Europe, eastern Europeans have repeatedly represented them as a moment of betrayal, martyrdom, liberation, victory, disappointment, loss, colonisation, or nostalgia.

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