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Hungary

The Human Factor in a New Democracy: Hungary in 2007

Elemer Hankiss, Director Hungarian Academy of Sciences Institute of Sociology

Poverty and the Traps of Hungary's Postcommunist Welfare Reforms

What is the nature of poverty? Is it the price societies must pay in order to achieve a successful transition to a market economy? Or is poverty a permanent feature of society, regardless of market type? These were the questions that Julia Szalai prompted her study of Hungarian welfare reforms 15 years after the transition to a free market began.

"Virtual" Nationalism: The Dual Citizenship Debate in Hungary and the New EU Border

"Virtual" Nationalism: The Dual Citizenship Debate in Hungary and the New EU Border
January 12, 2005
Staff-prepared summary of the EES discussion with Zsuzsa Csergo, Assistant Professor of Political Science, George Washington University

Prelude to Revolution: Deconstructing Society in Hungary, 1949-1953

Summary of the East European Studies discussion with Bianca Adair, a former Fulbright Scholar to Austria and Hungary and a Title VIII-supported EES Grant Recipient.

The Social Roots of Ethnic Conflict in East Central Europe: A Comparative Study of the German Diaspora in Hungary, Romania and Slovakia

Summary of the East European Studies meeting with Balazs Szelenyi, a Lecturer in the Department of History at the University of California, Los Angeles, CA, and a Title VIII-sponsored EES Research Scholar

Loyalty Amidst Treachery: Austrian-Hungarian Relations, 1955-1956

Summary of the East European Studies meeting with Bianca Adair, a Fulbright Scholar to Austria and Hungary and a former Title VIII-supported EES Research Scholar.

Nationalism and the Problem of Inclusion in Hungary

Summary of the East European Studies meeting with Alice Freifeld, Associate Professor of History at the University of Florida, FL.

Over the last 100 years Hungary has experienced conflict between the nationalist view of Hungary as a nation of and for Hungarians, and the reality of several hundred years of history in which non-ethnic Hungarians (including the Jews, Roma, and ethnic Germans) played a significant role in Hungarian society.

Contemporary Women's Movements in Hungary: Globalization, Democracy, and Gender Equality

As the first and only book in any language on contemporary women’s movements in Hungary, this groundbreaking study focuses on the role of women’s activism in a society where women are not yet adequately represented by established parties and political institutions. Drawing on eyewitness accounts of meetings and protests, as well as first-person interviews with leading female activists, Katalin Fábián examines the interactions between women’s groups in Hungary and studies the unique brand of democracy they have forged in postcommunist Eastern Europe.

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