Hungary | Wilson Center

Hungary

Failed Illusions: Moscow, Washington, Budapest, and the 1956 Hungarian Revolt

Winner of the 2007 Marshall Shulman Book Prize, awarded by the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies

The 1956 Hungarian revolution, and its suppression by the U.S.S.R., was a key event in the Cold War, demonstrating deep dissatisfaction with both the communist system and old-fashioned Soviet imperialism. But now, fifty years later, the simplicity of this David and Goliath story should be revisited, according to Charles Gati’s new history of the revolt.

Political Parties after Communism: Developments in East-Central Europe

After forty years of one-party rule under Communist regimes, how were the countries of East-Central Europe to get back to the business of competitive politics in 1989? One key factor was the resumption of party politics, and this book reviews the post-Communist development of parties in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, and Hungary. Kostelecký describes party history up to 1947, and then covers the Communist and post-Communist periods. Historical, cultural, and social factors are all taken into account in this synthetic work.

Nationalism and the Crowd in Liberal Hungary, 1848-1914

Hungary’s revolutionary crowd of 1848 was defeated in 1849, but crowds of other kinds and crowd politics remained central to Hungary as it fashioned itself over the next half-century. Nationalism and the Crowd in Liberal Hungary, 1848–1914 describes how the crowd’s shifting cast of characters participated in the making of Hungary inside the increasingly troubled Austro-Hungarian empire.

For Democracy's Sake: Foundations and Democracy Assistance in Central Europe

Assisting democracy has become a major concern of the international community since the end of the cold war. Not only governments, but private actors—foundations and other nongovernmental organizations—are playing a growing role in these efforts, rivaling that of governments and international institutions. This pathbreaking study examines foundations’ democracy assistance programs in Central Europe in the years immediately following the fall of the Berlin Wall, both measuring their size and evaluating their strategies.

Budapest 1956: Nagy Appeal (1:08)

Rus. Invades Hungary, 1956 - Budapest-Sound (3:47)

Hungary 1956 - Freedom Song (1:26)

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