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The Road to Copenhagen: Energy Solutions for Emerging Economies

Technology and innovation will be critical for China, India, and other emerging economies to reduce energy consumption and carbon emissions – and U.S. technology policy can help lead the way. New technologies such as solid state lighting systems, efficient nanocarbon materials and biomass energy offer hopeful prospects that can lead to equitable and sustainable development.

Living on $2 a Day: A Finance System for the "Bottom Billion"

On September 29, 2009, the Wilson Center on the Hill and the Environmental Change and Security Program hosted a discussion about the sophisticated ways by which the world's poor manage their finances. Daryl Collins, senior associate at Bankable Frontier Associates, and Jonathan Morduch, a Professor of Public Policy and Economics at New York University, shared some insights from their book, Portfolios of the Poor: How the World's Poor Live on $2 a Day. Geoff Dabelko, the Director of the Environmental Change and Security Program moderated the event.

Asia's Future: Critical Thinking for a Changing Environment

While Europe and the U.S. accomplished their own levels of environmental degradation over centuries, already densely populated Asia, with its lightning-speed economic development, natural resource-dependent economies, and globalization of trade, is currently playing out this environmental version of unsustainable growth in fast forward, and its rich biodiversity is paying the price. With change now occurring so rapidly, both globally and in Asia, some trends now appearing in the distance may all too soon become serious environmental threats.

Missing Women and Bare Branches: Gender Balance and Conflict

The emerging subfield of “security demographics” examines the linkages between population dynamics and the security trajectories of nation-states. For the last 5 to 10 years, researchers have examined the security aspects of such topics as the demographic transition, the sub-replacement birth rates of developed economies, the proportion of young men as compared to older men in the population, the effects of legal and illegal immigration, and the effects of pandemics such as AIDS and drug-resistant tuberculosis.

Parks for Peace or Peace for Parks? Issues in Practice and Policy

An upcoming ECSP publication—based on a conference held in September 2005 at the Wilson Center—will explore the rhetoric and reality of peace parks, including their goals and the factors that determine their success or failure. Drawing on future plans and successful projects in southern Africa, Kashmir, and South America, the authors debate whether peace parks can protect the environment and promote conflict resolution. ECSP Report presents excerpts from five of the conference papers as a preview of the publication forthcoming in 2006.

ECSP Report 11: Reviews of New Publications

Experts review new publications:

ECSP Report 7: Special Reports

The Linkages Between Population and Water: Forthcoming Articles from ECSP

In collaboration with the University of Michigan Population Fellows Program, ECSP commissioned in fall 2000 a series of articles to examine global and regional linkages between population and water. The interplay among these issues is at the heart of this project.Each of the three articles (summarized below) has been jointly written by a pair of authors, representing both a Northern and Southern perspective. Each article also draws on regional case-study material.

PECS News Issue 5 (Fall 2001)

PECS News Issue 5 includes:

Conflict and Contagion: A South Asia Simulation, featuring Dr. Helene Gayle (Event Summary)

Young Men and War: Could We Have Predicted the Distribution of Violent Conflicts at the End of the Millennium? (Event Summary)

Debating the Real State of the World: Are Dire Environmental Claims Backed by Sound Evidence? (Event Summary)

Geographic Information Systems as a Tool for Population-Environment Research - Jennifer Wisnewski Kaczor

Finding the Source: Urbanization and Intersectoral Competition for Water

This article examines the implications of urbanization for intersectoral competition over water, not only in technical or economic terms, but also in terms of political and social dynamics as well as the possibilities to meet the water needs of growing cities. It begins by looking at the water needs of each sector in urban and rural areas—the quantity, timing, and quality of water demand. The article identifies promising technical and institutional options for supply and demand management to provide adequate water services.

The "Strategic" Partnership Between India and Iran (PDF)

ABSTRACT: India and Iran—one the object of much wooing from Washington, the other a member of President Bush’s “axis of evil” —announced the creation of a “strategic partnership” in 2003. This Special Report explores the new cordiality in relations between New Delhi and Tehran, as well as the ways this partnership may impact upon the interests of other regional players. Christine Fair explains the calculations that make Iran an attractive partner for New Delhi, and concludes that the bilateral relationship is here to stay. Jalil Roshandel offers an Iranian perspective on the relationship.

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