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The Other Side of the Indian Growth Story: Confronting Agriculture and Rural Development

This Asia Program event, co-sponsored with the Environmental Change and Security Program of the Wilson Center, asked the important question of how and why agriculture and rural development factor into long-term economic growth and poverty reduction in India. Reducing world poverty is the first of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) chosen by the international community.

The Road to Copenhagen: Perspectives on Brazil, China and India

A lone ranger mindset inflicting both developed and developing countries stands in the way of a significant reduction of carbons emissions, but the world will eventually have to put differences aside in order to reach an agreement on climate change, according to a panel with experts on Brazil, China, and India who convened in anticipation of the upcoming UN Convention in Copenhagen.

Asia's Growing Crisis of Floods and Droughts

The Greater Himalayas, whose glaciers supply crucial seasonal water flows to some 40 percent of the world's population, are a climate change hot spot. The Tibetan Plateau has experienced a 1 degree Celsius temperature rise in the past decade alone and the 40,000+ glaciers in these mountains are in rapid retreat, posing grave environmental and human health threats. The prospect of catastrophic changes in normal season flows (sometimes too much, and at others times too little) from this Tibetan "water tower" is real.

U.S.-China Cooperation: The Co-benefits of Reducing Black Carbon

Many people think of climate change and air pollution as two different issues, stated Veerabhardan Ramanathan of the University of California, San Diego, but many pollutants have both warming effects and negative health impacts. Black carbon—a form of fine particulates emitted by diesel engines, agricultural & forest burning, cook stoves, and some industries—contributes to lung and heart disease and has significant impacts on climate by warming the atmosphere, affecting clouds and rainfall, and increasing the rate of snow melt in regions such as the Arctic and Himalayas.

NPIHP Partner IDSA Launches New Website

NPIHP is pleased to announce the launch of the New Delhi-based Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses' (IDSA's) dedicated NPIHP website.

Book Launch: <i>The Eagle and the Elephant: Strategic Aspects of U.S.-India Economic Engagement</i>

According to Raymond E. Vickery, economic engagement—trade, investment, lending, aid, and macroeconomic cooperation—constitutes the "engine" of strategic engagement. This theme is underscored repeatedly in Vickery's new book, The Eagle and the Elephant: Strategic Aspects of U.S.-India Economic Engagement, which was launched by the Asia Program at a June 1 event.

The Eagle and the Elephant: Strategic Aspects of US-India Economic Engagement

The Eagle and the Elephant shows how economic engagement directly affects how the United States cooperates with India on strategic issues. Through case studies of major efforts, including civil nuclear cooperation, services outsourcing, antiterrorism, and electricity generation and the environment, Raymond E. Vickery Jr. presents both successful and unsuccessful instances of complex collaborations between the two nations.

The Caged Phoenix: Can India Fly?

Dipankar Gupta, one of India’s foremost thinkers on social and economic issues, takes a critical—and controversial—look at the limits of the Indian success story in The Caged Phoenix. Through a fine blend of theory and new evidence on small scale industries, farming, and more, Gupta argues that, despite the promise of independence and liberalization, India continues to remain caged in backwardness. In short, the country’s phenomenal growth story has not translated into development.

Asian Diplomacy: The Foreign Ministries of China, India, Japan, Singapore, and Thailand

Based on over 160 interviews, Asian Diplomacy evaluates the ministries of foreign affairs in five major Asian countries. For each country, Kishan S. Rana first sketches the historical and political background of its diplomatic service. He reviews the structural features of the service; its responsibilities in such key areas as economic and political relations; and its methods for intragovernmental relations, decision making, and crisis management. He then provides a summary assessment of each service and concludes by asking what is special about Asian diplomacy.

The Inclusive City: Infrastructure and Public Services for the Urban Poor in Asia

Getting basic services—housing, transportation, trash disposal, water, and sanitation—poses almost unimaginable challenges to the urban poor of Asia. The Inclusive City provides case studies of how governmental programs attempt to meet these challenges by directly involving the poor themselves in improving their access to urban services through collaborative efforts. Case studies are drawn from the largest cities in India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, China (including Hong Kong), Indonesia, and the Philippines.

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